0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Effect of Galling on Metal Fracture in Cup Ironing Process

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Saito

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suzuka College of Technology, Shiroko-cho, Suzuka, 510-02, Japan

H. Saiki

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto, Japan

N. Kawai

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Japan

J. Tribol 111(4), 692-697 (Oct 01, 1989) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3261996 History: Received April 08, 1988; Online October 29, 2009

Abstract

The metal fracture mechanism in cup ironing process was investigated, taking into account the effect of the galling. Three types of metal cracking were observed, which are distinguishable from each other in crack appearance. The axial fracture stress measured at the ironed cup wall decreases as the galling becomes heavy, though the tensile strength of the ironed wall metal is scarcely decreased by the surface damage caused by the galling. In such cases, a stress concentration is always caused by the uneven circumferential distribution of the friction at the die-metal interface. The cracking begins at the circumferential position where the axial stress exerted on the ironed cup wall partially reaches the axial tensile strength of the ironed wall metal. The mean axial fracture stress is thus decreased. This also yields the decrease of crack propagation velocity and consequently the difference in crack appearance. The interaction between the tribological phenomena and the metal fracture behavior in the ironing process was clarified.

Copyright © 1989 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In