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RESEARCH PAPERS

Hydrodynamic Aspects of Fatigue in Plain Journal Bearings

[+] Author and Article Information
F. A. Martin

Design Techniques Section, The Glacier Metal Co., Ltd., Middlesex, England

D. R. Garner

Rotating Plant Section, The Glacier Metal Co., Ltd., Middlesex, England

D. R. Adams

Section Leader Theoretical Studies, AE Developments, Ltd.

J. of Lubrication Tech 103(1), 150-156 (Jan 01, 1981) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3251604 History: Received February 21, 1980; Online November 17, 2009

Abstract

The fatigue resistance of different bearing materials is usually given an “order of merit” in terms of specific load on the bearing. The bearing material cannot directly sense the applied specific load, since it is the hydrodynamic oil film pressures which directly create the stresses in the lining; both pressures and stresses need to be examined to see if a more meaningful criterion for fatigue can be found. As a first step in this study the experimental fatigue work carried out by Gyde at the University of Denmark was examined and compared with trends in peak specific load, hydrodynamic characteristics, and bearing lining stresses. It has been shown that peak specific load and peak hydrodynamic pressure are not in themselves realistic parameters, but that pressure variation on a bearing element, perhaps including some rapidly forming negative pressures, could be a significant term. The study of the more fundamental material stresses has not yet been extended to allow for the influence of any nonpositive film pressures, but results so far follow similar trends to those obtained on the pressure variation criterion.

Copyright © 1981 by ASME
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