0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Frictional Response of Sliding Interfaces Subjected to Time Varying Normal Pressures

[+] Author and Article Information
Vikas Prakash

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106

J. Tribol 120(1), 97-102 (Jan 01, 1998) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2834197 History: Received June 12, 1995; Revised March 21, 1997; Online January 24, 2008

Abstract

In the present investigation a plate-impact pressure shear loading device is employed to study frictional characteristics of sliding interfaces subjected to step changes in normal pressure. The present experimental configuration represents a significant improvement over the conventional tribology experiments by allowing the control of interfacial tractions through the use of pressure-shear loading waves instead of manipulating actuator motion. Moreover, the experimental configuration allows critical frictional parameters such as the applied normal pressure, the interfacial slip resistance, and the interfacial slip velocity to be interpreted by using the framework of one-dimensional plane wave analysis. The experimental results, deduced from the response to step changes imposed on the normal pressure at the frictional interface, reinforce the importance of including frictional memory in the development of the rate-dependent state variable friction models. The scope of the above experiments include technologically important combinations of workpiece materials such as 4340VAR structural steel and a commercially available titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), and tool materials such as tungsten based tool cermets (WC-Co alloys).

Copyright © 1998 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In