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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Lubricant Film Thickness in Rough Surface, Mixed Elastohydrodynamic Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
G. Guangteng, P. M. Cann, A. V. Olver, H. A. Spikes

Tribology Section, Imperial College, London SW7 2BX, United Kingdom

J. Tribol 122(1), 65-76 (Jul 14, 1999) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.555330 History: Received March 04, 1999; Revised July 14, 1999
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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References

Tallian,  T. E., 1972, “The Theory of Partial Elastohydrodynamic Contact,” Wear, 21, pp. 49–101.
Patir,  N., and Cheng,  H. S., 1979, “Application of Average Flow Models to Lubrication Between Rough Sliding Surfaces,” ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 101, pp. 220–230.
Kweh,  C. C., Evans,  H. P., and Snidle,  R. W., 1989, “Micro-Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication of an Elliptical Contact with Transverse and Three-Dimensional Sinusoidal Roughness,” ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 111, pp. 577–584.
Chang,  L., Jackson,  A., and Webster,  M. N., 1994, “Effects of 3-D Surface Topography on the EHL Film Thickness and Film Breakdown,” Tribol. Trans., 37, pp. 435–444.
Venner, C. H., and Lubrecht, A. A., 1999, “Amplitude Reduction of Anisotropic Harmonic Surface Patterns in EHL Circular Contacts Under Pure Rolling,” Presented at Leeds-Lyon Symposium, Lubrication at the Frontier, Lyon. Sept. 1998, published Elsevier Science B.V., 1999, D. Dowson et al., ed.
Elcoate, C. D., Evans, H. P., Hughes, T. G., and Snidle, R. W., 1999, “Thin Film, Time Dependent, Micro-EHL Solutions with Real Surface Roughnesses,” Presented at Leeds-Lyon Symposium, Lubrication at the Frontier, Lyon, Sept. 1998, published Elsevier Science B.V., 1999, D. Dowson et al., ed.
Chang,  L., 1995, “A Deterministic Model for Line Contact Partial Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication,” Tribol. Int., 28, pp. 75–84.
Fein, R. S., and Kreuz, K. L., 1968, Discussion to Boundary Lubrication by D. Godfrey, Interdisciplinary Approach to Friction and Wear, NASA Special Publication, SP181, pp. 358–376.
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Chang,  L., Webster,  M. N., Jackson,  A., 1993, “On the Pressure Rippling and Roughness in Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication of Rough Surfaces,” ASME J. Tribol., 115, pp. 439–444.
Spikes,  H. A., 1997, “Mixed Lubrication—An Overview,” Lubrication Science, 9, pp. 221–253.
Jackson,  A., and Cameron,  A., 1976, “An Interferometric Study of the EHL of Rough Surfaces,” ASLE Trans., 19, pp. 50–60.
Cusano,  C., and Wedeven,  L. D., 1980, “Elastohydrodynamic Film Thickness Measurements of Artificially Produced Non Smooth Surfaces,” ASLE Trans., 24, p. 1014.
Kaneta,  M., and Cameron,  A., 1980, “Effects of Asperities in Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication,” ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 102, pp. 374–379.
de Silva, G. M. S., Leather, J. A., and Sayles, R. S., 1986, “The Influence of Surface Topography on Lubricant Film Thickness in an Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) Point Contact,” Proc. 12th Leeds-Lyon Symposium, Sept. 1985, D. Dowson et al., eds., Butterworths, London.
Liang,  X., and Linqing,  Z., 1989, “A New Method for the Experimental Investigation of Contact in Mixed Lubrication,” Wear, 132, pp. 221–233.
Tondor,  K., and Jakobsen,  J., 1992, “Interferometric Studies of Effects of Striated Roughness on Lubricant Film Thickness under Elastohydrodynamic Conditions,” ASME J. Tribol., 114, pp. 52–56.
Kaneta, M., and Nishikawa, H., 1999, “The Effects of a Transversely Oriented Bump on Point Contact EHL in Reciprocating Motion with a Small Stroke Length,” Presented at Leeds-Lyon Symposium, Lubrication at the Frontier, Lyon. Sept. 1998, published Elsevier Science B.V., 1999, D. Dowson et al., ed.
Guangteng, G., and Spikes, H. A., 1997, “An Experimental Study of Film Thickness in the Mixed Lubrication Regime,” Proc. 24th Leeds-Lyon Symposium. Elastohydrodynamics-96, Sept. 1996, pp. 159–166. D. Dowson et al., eds., Elsevier. Amsterdam.
Smeeth,  M., and Spikes,  H. A., 1997, “Central and Minimum Elastohydrodynamic Film Thickness at High Contact Pressure,” ASME J. Tribol., 119, pp. 291–296.
Cann,  P. M., Hutchinson,  J., and Spikes,  H. A., 1996, “The Development of a Spacer Layer Imaging Method (SLIM) for Mapping Elastohydrodynamic Contacts,” Tribol. Trans., 39, pp. 915–921.
Guangteng, G., Cann, P. M., Olver, A. V., and Spikes, H. A., 1998, “An Experimental Study of Film Thickness Between Rough Surfaces in EHD Contact,” Proc. 5th Intern. Conf., Austrib ’98, Tribology at Work, Brisbane, Dec. 1998, D. J. Hargreaves, W. Scott, eds., I.Mech.E., Australia.
Guangteng, G., Cann, P. M., Olver, A. V., and Spikes, H. A., 1999, “Mapping Surface Features in the Thin Film Lubrication Regime,” Presented at Leeds-Lyon Symposium, Lubrication at the Frontier, Lyon, Sept. 1998, published Elsevier Science B.V., 1999, D. Dowson et al., ed.
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Hartl,  K., Krupka,  I., and Liska,  M., 1997, “Differential Colorimetry: Tools for Evaluation of Chromatic Interference Patterns,” Opt. Eng., 36, pp. 1–8.
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Figures

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Schematic of test setup
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Optical profilometer maps of artificial roughness features. (a) Single transverse ridge. (b) 2-D array of circular bumps.
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Comparison of SLIM film thickness measurements with ultrathin film interferometry
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Influence of contact pressure on effective spacer layer thickness (relative to 0.45 GPa)
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Film thickness maps for a single transverse ridge in contact (inlet of left). (a) Static contact, (b) 0.0125 m/s, (c) 0.059 m/s, (d) 0.104 m/s.
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Film thickness profiles for a single transverse ridge in contact (inlet on left). (a) Static contact. (b) 0.0125 m/s. (c) 0.059 m/s. (d) 0.104 m/s.
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(Top) Film thickness maps for a multiple transverse ridges in contact (inlet on left). (a) Static contact, (b) 0.113 m/s. (Bottom) Film thickness maps for a multiple longitudinal ridges in contact (inlet on left). (c) Static contact, (d) 0.108 m/s.
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Film thickness profiles for a multiple transverse ridges in contact (inlet on left). (a) 0.0142 m/s. (b) 0.0540 m/s.
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Film thickness profiles for a multiple longitudinal ridges in contact (inlet on left). (a) 0.0138 m/s. (b) 0.0545 m/s.
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(Top) Film thickness maps for 2-D array of bumps in contact (inlet on left). (a) Static contact, (b) 0.103 m/s. (Bottom) Film thickness maps for random rough surface in contact (inlet on left). (c) 0.0210 m/s, (d) 0.108 m/s.
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Film thickness profiles for 2-D array of bumps in contact at 0.103 m/s (inlet on left)
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Film thickness profile for a single transverse ridge in the contact inlet (inlet on left)
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Film thickness versus speed plots for single transverse ridge in contact (smooth=mean central film thickness for smooth ball)
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Film thickness map for single transverse ridge at 62% slide roll ratio (disk faster) (inlet on left)
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Variation of in-contact effective root mean square roughness for 2-D array of bumps
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Variation of in-contact effective root mean square roughness for random rough surface
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Film thickness versus speed plots for multiple transverse ridges in contact (smooth=mean central film thickness for smooth ball)
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Film thickness versus speed plots for multiple longitudinal ridges in contact (smooth=mean central film thickness for smooth ball)
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Film thickness versus speed plots for 2-D array of bumps in contact (smooth=mean central film thickness for smooth ball)
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Comparison of mean film thickness versus speed plots for different surface roughnesses (smooth=mean central film thickness for smooth ball)
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Comparison of minimum film thickness versus speed plots for different surface roughnesses
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Influence of sliding speed on film thickness for single transverse ridge
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Film thickness versus speed plots for random rough surfaces in contact (smooth=mean central film thickness for smooth ball)

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