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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Three-Dimensional Thermomechanical Model of Contact Between Non-Conforming Rough Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Shuangbiao Liu, Qian Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208

J. Tribol 123(1), 17-26 (Aug 01, 2000) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1327585 History: Received February 16, 2000; Revised August 01, 2000
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Asperities in a non-conforming contact subject to frictional heating
Grahic Jump Location
Model verifications (IC: DC-FFT/ICs/Green’s function. FRF: DC-FFT/FRF/conversion. y=0): (a) temperature rise due to the circular heat source (a=0.2 mm); (b) normal thermoelastic displacement due to the ring heat source (a=0.2 mm); (c) normal thermoelastic displacement due to the circular heat source (a=0.2 mm); and (d) normal displacement due to the friction in the circular area (a=0.4 mm).
Grahic Jump Location
Performance of a smooth surface in contact (F0=150 N): (a) isothermal pressure distribution; and (b) thermomechanical solution for pressure (Qf =0.2 m/s).
Grahic Jump Location
Performance of rough surface No. 1 in contact without considering yield (F0=100 N): (a) the rough surface No. 1 (RMS roughness=0.21 μm, the correlation length is larger than 10); (b) isothermal solutions for pressure and gap; and (c) thermomechanical solution for temperature, pressure, and gap (Qf =0.2 m/s).
Grahic Jump Location
Performance of rough surface No. 1 in contact with yield (F0=100 N): (a) Isothermal solutions for pressure and gap; and (b) Thermomechanical solution for pressure, gap and temperature (Qf =0.2 m/s).
Grahic Jump Location
Performance of rough surface No. 2 in contact (F0=100 N): (a) surface No. 2 (RMS roughness=0.23 μm, the correlation length is 1.0); and (b) isothermal solutions for pressure and gap.
Grahic Jump Location
Performance of rough surface No. 2 in contact (F0=100 N): (a) thermomechanical solutions for pressure, gap, and temperature (Qf =0.1 m/s); and (b) thermomechanical solution for pressure, gap, and temperature (Qf =0.2 m/s).

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