0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

Elastohydrodynamic Film Collapse During Rapid Deceleration. Part I—Experimental Results

[+] Author and Article Information
R. P. Glovnea, H. A. Spikes

Tribology Section, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, United Kingdom

J. Tribol 123(2), 254-261 (Feb 11, 2000) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1308011 History: Received October 25, 1999; Revised February 11, 2000
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Ertel,  A. M., 1939, “Hydrodynamic lubrication based on new principles,” Akad. Nauk. SSSR Prikad. Math. I Mekh., 3, pp. 41–52.
Grubin, A. N., and Vinogradova, I. E., 1949, “Fundamentals of the hydrodynamic theory of lubrication of heavily loaded cylindrical surfaces,” (in Russian), Central Scientific Research Institute for Technology and Mechanical Engineering, Book No. 30, Moscow, 1949, translation No. 337 into English by the Department of Science and Industrial Research, U.K.
Dowson,  D., and Higginson,  G. R., 1959, “A numerical solution to the elastohydrodynamic problem,” J. Mech. Eng. Sci., 1, pp. 6–15.
Hamrock, B. T., and Dowson, D. 1981, Ball Bearing Lubrication: The Elastohydrodynamics of Elliptical Contacts, Wiley, New York.
Blahey, A. G., and Schneider, G. E. 1987, “A full E.H.L. solution for line contacts under sliding-rolling condition with a non-Newtonian rheological model,” Proc. 13th Leeds-Lyon Symp. Fluid Film Lubrication, D. Dowson et al., ed., Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 219–230.
Venner, C. H., 1991, “Multilevel solution of the EHL line and point contact problems,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Twente, The Netherlands.
Vichard,  J. P., 1971, “Transient effects in the lubrication of Hertzian contacts,” J. Mech. Eng. Sci., 13, pp. 173–189.
Sanborn,  D. M., and Winer,  W. O., 1971, “Fluid rheological effects in sliding elastohydrodynamic point contacts with transient loading: 1-film thickness,” Trans. ASME, J. Lub. Tech., 93, pp. 262–271.
Ren,  N., Zhu,  D., and Wen,  S. Z., 1991, “Experimental method for quantitative analysis of transient EHL,” Tribol. Int., 24, pp. 225–230.
Nishikawa,  H., and Kaneta,  M., 1995a, “Traction in EHL under Pure Sliding Reciprocating with Cyclic Impact Loading,” JSME Int. J. Series C, 38, pp. 568–576.
Nishikawa,  H., Handa,  K., Teshima,  K., Matsuda,  K., and Kaneta,  M., 1995b, “Behavior of EHL Films in Cyclic Squeeze Motion,” JSME Int. J. Series C, 38, pp. 577–585.
Holland,  J., 1978, “Die instationäre Elastohydrodynamik,” Konstruction, 30, pp. 363–369.
Spikes,  H. A., 1997, “Mixed lubrication-an overview,” Lubr. Sci., 9, pp. 221–253.
Christensen,  H., 1970, “Elastohydrodynamic theory of spherical bodies in normal approach,” Trans. ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 92, pp. 145–154.
Herrebrugh,  K., 1970, “Elastohydrodynamic squeeze films between two cylinders in normal approach,” Trans. ASME, J. Lubr. Technol., 92, pp. 292–302.
Lee,  K. M., and Cheng,  H. S., 1973, “The pressure and deformation profiles between two normally approaching lubricated cylinders,” Trans. ASME, J. Lubr. Technol., 95, pp. 308–320.
Rohde,  S. M., Whicker,  D., and Browne,  A. L., 1976, “Dynamic analysis of elastohydrodynamic squeeze films,” Trans. ASME, J. Lubr. Technol., 98, pp. 401–408.
Yang,  P. R., and Wen,  S. Z., 1991, “Pure squeeze action in an isothermal elastohydrodynamically lubricated spherical conjunction,” Wear, 142, pp. 1–16.
Dowson,  D., and Wang,  D., 1994, “An analysis of the normal bouncing of a solid elastic ball on an oily plate,” Wear, 179, pp. 29–37.
Larsson,  R., and Höglund,  E., 1995, “Numerical simulation of a ball impacting and rebounding a lubricated surface,” Trans. ASME, J. Tribol., 117, pp. 94–102.
Wijnant, Y., 1998, “Contact Dynamics in the Field of Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.
Petrusevitch,  A. I., Kodnir,  R. S., Salukvadze,  R. G., Bakashvili,  D. L., and Schwarzman,  V. Sh., 1972, “The investigation of oil film thickness in lubricated ball-race rolling contact,” Wear, 18, pp. 369–389.
Wu Y-W., and Yan, S-M., 1987, “A full numerical solution for the non-steady state elastohydrodynamic problem in nominal line contacts,” Proc. 13th Leeds-Lyon Symp. Sept. 1986., Fluid Film Lubrication, D. Dowson et al., ed., Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 291–298.
Ai,  X., and Yu,  H., 1988, “A full numerical solution for general transient elastohydrodynamic line contacts and its application,” Wear, 121, pp. 143–159.
Dowson,  D., Taylor,  C. M., and Zhu,  G., 1992, “A transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a cam and follower,” J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 25, pp. A313–A320.
Larsson,  R., and Lundberg,  J., 1994, “A simplified solution to the combined squeezesliding lubrication problem,” Wear, 173, pp. 85–94.
Hooke,  C. J., 1993, “The minimum film thickness in line contacts during reversal of entrainment,” Trans. ASME, J. Tribol., 115, pp. 191–199.
Hooke,  C. J., 1994, “The minimum film thickness in lubricated line contacts during reversal of entrainment-general solution and the development of a design chart,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., J208, pp. 53–64.
Diaconescu,  E. N., and Glovnea,  R. P., 1994, “A new one dimensional Reynolds equation for unsteady speed regime,” Acta Tribologica, 2, pp. 89–96.
Paul,  G., and Cameron,  A., 1972, “An absolute high pressure microviscometer based on refractive index,” Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A, A331, pp. 171–184.
Wada,  S., and Tsukijihara,  M., 1980, “Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of squeeze films (Part 2, Two spherical bodies lubricated with grease),” Bull. JSME, 23, pp. 766–772.
Wong,  P. L., Lingard,  S., and Cameron,  A., 1992, “The high pressure impact microviscometer,” Tribol. Trans., 35, pp. 500–508.
Nishikawa,  H., Handa,  K., and Kaneta,  M., 1995c, “Behavior of EHL films in reciprocating motion,” JSME Int. J. Series C, 38, pp. 558–567.
Scales,  L. E., Rycroft,  J. E., Horswill,  N. R., and Williamson,  B. P., 1996, “Simulation and observation of transient effects in elastohydrodynamic lubrication,” SAE Tech. Paper, 961143.
Rutlin, H. C., Sayles, R. S., and Starkey, M. S, 1997, “An optical EHD study using a reciprocating Hertzian contact rig designed to simulate the kinematics of constant velocity joints,” Proc. 23rd Leeds-Lyon Symp., Tribology, Elastohydrodynamics-96, D. Dowson et al., ed., Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 297–303.
Glovnea,  R. P., Diaconescu,  E. N., and Flamand,  L., 1995, “EHD film thickness under transient speed conditions,” Acta Tribol., 3, pp. 31–36.
Sugimura, J., and Spikes, H. A., 1997, “Technique for measuring EHD film thickness in non-steady state contact conditions,” Proc. 23rd Leeds-Lyon Symposium, Elastohydrodynamics `96, D. Dowson et al., ed., Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp. 91–100
Sugimura,  J., Jones,  W. R., and Spikes,  H. A., 1998, “EHD film thickness in non-steady state contacts,” Trans. ASME, J. Tribol., 120, pp. 442–452.
Sugimura,  J., Okumura,  T., Yamamoto,  Y., and Spikes,  H. A., 1999, “Simple equation for elastohydrodynamic film thickness under acceleration,” Tribol. Int., 32, pp. 117–123.
Glovnea, R. P., and Spikes, H. A., 1999, “The influence of lubricant on film collapse rate in high pressure thin film behavior during sudden halting of motion,” presented at the Annual STLE Meeting, Las Vegas, May 1999, accepted for publication in STLE Tribology Transactions.
Johnston,  G. J., Wayte,  R., and Spikes,  H. A., 1991, “The measurement and study of very thin lubricant films in concentrated contacts,” Tribol. Trans., 34, pp. 187–194.
Smeeth,  M., and Spikes,  H. A., 1997, “Central and minimum elastohydrodynamic film thickness at high contact pressure,” Trans. ASME, J. Trib., 119, pp. 291–296.
Hamrock,  B. T., and Dowson,  D., 1977, “Isothermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication of point contacts. Part III. Fully flooded results,” Trans. ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 99, pp. 264–276.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
The influence of initial speed upon central film thickness
Grahic Jump Location
Film thickness profiles in sliding direction for PAO during rapid halting from initial speed 0.3 m/s
Grahic Jump Location
Film thickness profiles transverse to sliding direction for PAO during rapid halting from initial speed 0.3 m/s
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Decay in ball velocity during rapid halting from different initial speeds. (b) Central film thickness during rapid halting from different initial speeds
Grahic Jump Location
Central film thickness collapse at six different halting times
Grahic Jump Location
Dependence of central film thickness at end of first stage on halting time
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of measured film thickness collapse with steady-state prediction at 60 ms halting time (10 m/s2 deceleration rate)
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of measured film thickness collapse with steady-state prediction at 0.6 s halting time (1 m/s2 deceleration rate)
Grahic Jump Location
Ball and disk surface speed variation during rapid halting
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of measured results with predictions of Hamrock and Dowson 43 steady-state formula in a pure rolling test (set stopping time of 5 ms)
Grahic Jump Location
Central film thickness variation for three different decelerations, in pure rolling test
Grahic Jump Location
The dependence of the film thickness at the end of the first stage of the time logarithm
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison between experiment and theory due to Sugimura et al. 39
Grahic Jump Location
Principle of ultrathin film interferometry and experimental setup
Grahic Jump Location
Central film thickness during rapid halting from initial speed 0.5 m/s
Grahic Jump Location
Expanded time-scale plot of central film thickness collapse shown in Fig. 2

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In