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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Tribology in Metal Cutting—Some Thermal Issues

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Komanduri, Z. B. Hou

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078

J. Tribol 123(4), 799-815 (Jan 09, 2001) (17 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1353589 History: Received December 22, 2000; Revised January 09, 2001
Copyright © 2001 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Summary of different thermal models used by various researchers for the temperature rise in the chip and the work material caused by the shear plane heat source in orthogonal machining (Komanduri and Hou 17): (a) Trigger and Chao’s model, 1951; (b) Hahn’s model, 1951; (c) Chao and Trigger’s model, 1953; (d) Loewen and Shaw’s model, 1954; (e) Leone’s model, 1954; (f ) Weiner’s model, 1955; (g) Dutt and Brewer’s model, 1965; and (h) Dawson and Malkin’s model, 1984.
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Orthogonal metal cutting with a sharp tool showing two heat sources, namely, the shear plane (primary) heat source and the chip-tool interface friction (secondary) heat source along with their respective image heat sources (note as the tool is sharp, there is no flank-work interface frictional heat source); (b) orthogonal metal cutting process showing three heat sources, namely, the shear plane (primary) heat source, the chip-tool interface friction (secondary) heat source, and the flank-work interface (tertiary) heat source along with their respective image heat sources.
Grahic Jump Location
Modified Hahn’s model (proposed model) for the determination of the temperature rise in the work material and the chip, respectively caused by the shear plane heat source in machining (Komanduri and Hou 17): (a) model for thermal analysis of work; (b) model for thermal analysis of chip.
Grahic Jump Location
Schematic of a moving oblique band heat source model for the shear plane heat source in a semi-infinite medium for continuous chip formation process in metal cutting (Komanduri and Hou 17)
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Schematic showing the heat transfer model for the frictional heat source at the tool-chip interface on the chip side considering it as a moving band heat source problem (Komanduri and Hou 23); (b) schematic showing the heat transfer model of the frictional heat source at the tool-chip interface on the tool side considering it as a stationary rectangular heat source problem (Komanduri and Hou 23).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Temperature rise distribution at the tool-chip interface for conventional machining of steel (NE 9445) considering the heat liberation intensity of the heat source to be uniformly distributed on both sides of the tool-chip interface (Komanduri and Hou 23); (b) temperature rise distribution at the tool-chip interface for ultraprecision machining of aluminum with a single crystal diamond tool considering the heat liberation intensity of the heat source to be uniformly distributed on both sides of the tool-chip interface (Komanduri and Hou 23).
Grahic Jump Location
Schematic of the heat transfer model with a common coordinate system for the case of combined effect of the two principal sources, namely, the shear plane heat source and the tool-chip interface frictional heat source in metal cutting (Komanduri and Hou 42)
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Temperature rise distribution in the work material and the chip due to shear plane heat source in conventional machining of steel (NE 9445), using data from Chao and Trigger 6); (b) temperature rise distribution in the work material and the chip due to shear plane heat source in ultraprecision machining of aluminum using data from Ueda et al. 38 (Komanduri and Hou 17).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Temperature rise distribution in the tool and the chip due to frictional heat source at the tool-chip interface in conventional machining of steel using data from Chao and Trigger 6 (Komanduri and Hou 23); (b) temperature rise distribution in the tool and the chip due to frictional heat source at the tool-chip interface in ultra-precision machining of aluminum using data from Ueda et al. 38 (Komanduri and Hou 23).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Variation of the temperature rise with li/L on the chip side and the tool side due to frictional heat source at the tool-chip interface obtained by matching the power functions (Eqs. (9), (10)) for conventional machining of steel (NE 9445) using data from Chao and Trigger 6 (Komanduri and Hou 23); (b) variation of the temperature rise with li/L on the chip side and the tool side due to frictional heat source at the tool-chip interface obtained by matching the power functions (Eqs. (9), (10)) for ultraprecision machining of aluminum using data from Ueda et al. 38 (Komanduri and Hou 23).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Isotherms of the temperature rise in the chip, the tool, and the work material under the combined effect of the shear plane and the tool-chip frictional heat sources for the case of conventional machining of steel with a carbide tool using data from Chao and Trigger 6 (Komanduri and Hou, 42); (b) isotherms of the temperature rise in the chip, the tool, and the work material under the combined effect of the shear plane and the tool-chip frictional heat sources for the case of ultra-precision machining of aluminum with a single crystal diamond tool using data from Ueda et al. 38 (Komanduri and Hou 42).
Grahic Jump Location
(a) variation of the temperature rise with li/L on the chip side and the tool side at the tool-chip interface due to combined heat sources obtained by matching the power functions (Eqs. (12), (13)) for conventional machining of steel using data from Chao and Trigger 6 (also shown is the contribution due to the frictional heat source alone for comparison (Komanduri and Hou 42)); (b) variation of the temperature rise with li/L on the chip side and the tool side at the tool-chip interface due to combined heat sources obtained by matching the power functions (Eqs. (12), (13)) for ultraprecision machining of aluminum using data from Ueda et al. 38 (also shown is the contribution due to the frictional heat source alone for comparison (Komanduri and Hou 42)).
Grahic Jump Location
Variation of heat partition in the work material, Bapp with the thermal number Nth due to shear plane heat source (Komanduri and Hou 17)

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