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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Measurement and Prediction of Tape Cupping Under Mechanical and Hygrothermal Loads and Its Influence on Debris Generation in Linear Tape Drives

[+] Author and Article Information
William W. Scott, Bharat Bhushan

Nanotribology Laboratory for Information Storage and MEMS/NEMS, Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210

J. Tribol 125(2), 364-376 (Mar 19, 2003) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1537263 History: Received February 14, 2002; Revised August 06, 2002; Online March 19, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Changes in dimensionless cupping with changes in various dimensionless Young’s moduli and layer thickness values for a tensile load of 78.7 N/m
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Changes in dimensionless cupping with changes in thermal expansion coefficients for a temperature change of 10°C, and with changes in hygroscopic expansion coefficients for a relative humidity change of 50 percent
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Undeformed FEM mesh (before loading) and deformed mesh after application of a tensile and normal load. The top surface is the front coat. Note that this mesh represents one half of the tape shown in Fig. 7 (because of symmetry in the x-direction). The top edge is constrained in the z-direction and the elements near the bottom edge are subjected to the normal load.
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Changes in cupping distance with changes in various dimensionless Young’s moduli and layer thickness values for a tensile load of 78.7 N/m and a normal load of 38.1 N/m acting at the center region of the tape. Note that the vertical scale for these plots is different than those in Fig. 11 and Fig. 12.
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Cross-sectional schematic of tape that shows the three major tape layers, the definition of cupping (κy is cupping), the positive/negative cupping convention, and the definition of “d,” which is the vertical distance between the cupped apex and the tape edge
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Cross-sectional schematic that shows typical MP and ME tape layer thickness values
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Schematic that shows a contact between a negatively cupped tape and a head; most tapes have a residual cupping to avoid aggressive contact between the tape edge and head
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Stylus profile showing edge wear of Mn-Zn ferrite following a drive test with CoFe2O3 tape (from Ref. 8)
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Schematic of commercial two-bump head used in debris experiments
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(a) Schematic that shows the definition of z0,z1,z2, and z3 used in calculations and (b) a schematic that shows axis orientations and the orientation of the tensile load for a tape that experiences only a tensile load
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Schematic that shows axis orientations and the orientation of tensile and normal loads for a tape in contact with a head
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(a) Measured residual cupping profiles for a 9840 tape, a DLT tape, and an Ultrium tape, (b) measured residual cupping variation among three reels of 9840 tape and among three reels of Ultrium tape, and (c) measured cupping profiles for 9840 tape, reel 1 (from Fig. 8(b)), 9840 tape, reel 2 (from Fig. 8(b)), and DLT tape for four different tensions: 0 N, 1.5 N, 2.2 N, and 3.0 N. For these profiles, the front coat faces down.
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Debris distribution across head following drive tests for 2000 cycles, for two reels of 9840 tape, one with a relatively flat residual cupping profile (reel 1 from Fig. 8(b)) and one with a relatively large negative residual cupping profile (reel 2 from Fig. 8(b))
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SEM micrographs of virgin tape edges and tape edges after debris test stoppages

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