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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Nano-Scale Fatigue Wear of Carbon Nitride Coatings: Part II—Wear Mechanisms

[+] Author and Article Information
Dong F. Wang

Laboratory of Biomechanical Engineering, Department of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japan

Koji Kato

Laboratory of Tribology, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japan

J. Tribol 125(2), 437-444 (Mar 19, 2003) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1537267 History: Received June 28, 2001; Revised August 01, 2002; Online March 19, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Asperity contact between the diamond pin and the coating
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A schematic model for flow and delamination wear, in ploughing, due to repeated sliding: (a) N=0; (b) N=1; (c) N<Nc; and (d) N>Nc.
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(a) Example for measuring the total increase of the plastically deformed amount until the critical number of friction cycles, Nc, and (b) showing the correlation among the asperity radius R, the increase of the plastically deformed amount at nth friction cycles, and the contact radius, a
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The representative plastic strain as a function of the critical number of friction cycles, Nc, with respect to nitrogen incorporation condition (coating hardness)
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The representative plastic strain as a function of the critical number of friction cycles, Nc, with respect to coating thickness
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The representative plastic strain as a function of the critical number of friction cycles, Nc, with respect to relative humidity
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Relationship between the representative plastic strain Δεp and the critical number of friction cycles, Nc, by bring all available data from this study together
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The critical number of friction cycles, Nc, as a function of nano-indentation hardness of carbon nitride coatings
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Indentation of a semi-infinite elastic perfectly-plastic solid by a rigid spherical indenter: (a) geometry of deformation; (b) pressure distribution along the contact area.
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The critical number of friction cycles, Nc, as a function of the coating thickness h: (a) asperity radius R=250 nm with respect to Pmax; (b) Pmax=12 GPa with respect to asperity radius R.
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Modeling results, showing the maximum critical number of friction cycles, Nc, as a function of the radius of asperity R with respect to Pmax. The modeling result at R=250 nm is in good agreement with experimental results.
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A wear mode diagram for abrasive wear of cutting, wedge forming and plowing, after K. Hokkirigawa and K. Kato 27. Both the “Low cycle fatigue” and the “High cycle fatigue” regions inside the plowing regime were introduced by K. Kato.

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