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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Lubricants With Non-Newtonian Rheology and Their Degradation in Line Contacts

[+] Author and Article Information
Ilya I. Kudish, Ruben G. Airapetyan

Kettering University, Flint, MI 48504, USA

J. Tribol 126(1), 112-124 (Jan 13, 2004) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1609484 History: Received April 01, 2003; Revised June 05, 2003; Online January 13, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

Bair,  S., and Winer,  W. O., 1979, “Shear Strength Measurements of Lubricants at High Pressure,” J. Lubr. Technol., 101(3), pp. 251–257.
Hoglund,  E., and Jacobson,  B., 1986, “Experimental Investigations of the Shear Strength of Lubricants Subjected to High Pressure and Temperature,” ASME J. Tribol., 108(4), pp. 571–578.
Eyring,  H., 1936, “Viscosity, Plasticity, and Diffusion as Examples of Absolute Reaction Rates,” J. Chem. Phys., 4(4), pp. 283–291.
Houpert, L. G., and Hamrock, B. J., 1985, “Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Calculations Used as a Tool to Study Scuffing,” in Mechanisms and Surface Distress: Global Studies of Mechanisms and Local Analyses of Surface Distress Phenomena, D. Dowson et al., eds., Butterworths, England, pp. 146–162.
Kudish, I. I., 1982, “Asymptotic Methods for Studying Plane Problems of the Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Theory in Heavily Loaded Regimes. Part 1. Isothermal Problem,” Izvestija Akademii Nauk Arm.SSR, Mekhanika, 35 (5), pp. 46–64.
Crail,  I. R. H., and Neville,  A. L., 1969, “The Mechanical Shear Stability of Polymeric VI Improvers,” J. Inst. Pet., 55(542), pp. 100–108.
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Walker,  D. L., Sanborn,  D. M., and Winer,  W. O., 1975, “Molecular Degradation of Lubricants in Sliding Elastohydrodynamic Contacts,” ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 97(3), pp. 390–397.
Yu,  J. F. S., Zakin,  J. L., and Patterson,  G. K., 1979, “Mechanical Degradation of High Molecular Weight Polymers in Dilute Solution,” J. Appl. Polym. Sci., 23, pp. 2493–2512.
Odell,  J. A., Keller,  A., and Rabin,  Y., 1988, “Flow-Induced Scission of Isolated Macromolecules,” J. Chem. Phys., 88(6), pp. 4022–4028.
Covitch, M. J., 1998, “How Polymer Architecture Affects Permanent Viscosity Loss of Multigrade Lubricants,” SAE Technical Paper Series, Paper No. 982638.
Ziff,  R. M., and McGrady,  E. D., 1985, “The Kinetics of Cluster Fragmentation and Depolymerization,” J. Phys. A, 18, pp. 3027–3037.
Ziff,  R. M., and McGrady,  E. D., 1986, “Kinetics of Polymer Degradation,” Macromolecules, 19, pp. 2513–2519.
McGrady,  E. D., and Ziff,  R. M., 1988, “Analytical Solutions to Fragmentation Equations With Flow,” AIChE J., 34(12), pp. 2073–2076.
Montroll,  E. W., and Simha,  R., 1940, “Theory of Depolymerization of Long Chain Molecules,” J. Chem. Phys., 8, pp. 721–727.
Saito,  O., 1958, “On the Effect of High Energy Radiation to Polymers. I, Cross-Linking and Degradation,” J. Phys. S. of Japan, 13, pp. 198–206.
Kudish, I. I., and Ben-Amotz, D., 1999, “Modeling Polymer Molecule Scission in EHL Contacts,” in The Advancing Frontier of Engineering Tribology, Proc. of the 1999 STLE/ASME H. S. Cheng Tribology Surveillance, Q. Wang, J. Netzel, and F. Sadeghi, eds., pp. 176–182.
Kudish,  I. I., Airapetyan,  R. G., and Covitch,  M. J., 2002, “Modeling of Kinetics of Strain-Induced Degradation of Polymer Additives in Lubricants,” J. of Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences,12(6), pp. 1–22.
Kudish,  I. I., Airapetyan,  R. G., and Covitch,  M. J., 2003, “Modeling of Kinetics of Stress-Induced Degradation of Polymer Additives in Lubricants and Viscosity Loss,” STLE Tribol. Trans., 46(1), pp. 1–11.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
The map of flow streamlines z(x) for the non-degrading lubricant with Newtonian rheology, s0=0
Grahic Jump Location
The pressure distribution p(x) for the lubricant with Newtonian (solid line) rheology, s0=0. The Hertzian pressure distribution is represented by a dashed line.
Grahic Jump Location
The gap distribution h(x) for the lubricant with Newtonian rheology, s0=0
Grahic Jump Location
The sliding frictional stress f(x) distributions for the non-degrading lubricants with Newtonian (dashed line) and non-Newtonian (solid line) rheologies and for the degrading lubricants with Newtonian (dashed bold line) and non-Newtonian (solid bold line) rheologies, s0=−0.5
Grahic Jump Location
Frictional stresses τ1 and τ2 applied to the contact surfaces for nondegrading (dashed line) and degrading (bold dashed line) Newtonian lubricants and for non-degrading (solid line) and degrading (bold solid line) non-Newtonian lubricants under mixed rolling and sliding conditions (s0=−0.5) and the surface frictional stresses τ2=−τ1=(6H02/V)hdp/dx) for the nondegrading Newtonian lubricant (dashed-dotted line) under pure rolling conditions (s0=0)
Grahic Jump Location
The map of the flow streamlines for the degrading lubricant with the non-Newtonian rheology under pure rolling conditions (s0=0)
Grahic Jump Location
The map of the horizontal component u of the lubricant velocity along the flow streamlines for the degrading lubricant with the non-Newtonian rheology under pure rolling conditions (s0=0)
Grahic Jump Location
The reciprocal of the lubricant viscosity μ in the Newtonian and non-Newtonian lubrication film under pure rolling conditions (s0=0). The variable z is an artificially stretched z-coordinate across the film thickness (namely, z=zh(a)/h(x)) to make the relationship more transparent.
Grahic Jump Location
The distribution of the molecular weight W in the degrading lubricants with Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies along the flow streamline closest to z=0 and running through the whole contact below z=0 under pure rolling conditions (s0=0)
Grahic Jump Location
The map of the flow streamlines z(x) for the degrading lubricants with Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies under mixed rolling and sliding conditions (s0=−0.5)
Grahic Jump Location
The map of the horizontal component u of the lubricant velocity along the flow streamlines for the degrading lubricants with Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies under mixed rolling and sliding conditions (s0=−0.5)
Grahic Jump Location
The reciprocal of the viscosity μ in the lubricants with Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies under mixed rolling and sliding conditions (s0=−0.5). The variable z is an artificially stretched z-coordinate across the film thickness (namely, z=zh(a)/h(x)) to make the relationship more transparent.
Grahic Jump Location
The distribution of the molecular weight W in the degrading lubricants with Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies along the flow streamline closest to z=0 and running through the whole contact below z=0 under mixed rolling and sliding conditions (s0=−0.5)

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