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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Computer Thermal Model of Mixed Lubrication in Point Contacts

[+] Author and Article Information
Wen-Zhong Wang, Yu-Chuan Liu, Hui Wang, Yuan-Zhong Hu

The State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing, People’s Republic of China

J. Tribol 126(1), 162-170 (Jan 13, 2004) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1631012 History: Received February 18, 2002; Revised May 05, 2003; Online January 13, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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The flowchart of the calculation
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Smooth surfaces under simple sliding condition U=0.001 mm/s
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Comparison of maximum temperature rise with available results
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Smooth EHL solution, S=1.5,U=1200 mm/s,W=800 N
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pressure distribution and temperature rise at y=0 for a single asperity moving through the circular contact conjunction with U=1200 mm/s. In pressure profiles, solid line is for thermal solution and dash line for isothermal solution. On temperature curves, the open circles correspond to the temperature rises on upper surfaces in contact and open squares correspond to that on lower surface while the dash lines indicate the solutions from smooth EHL contacts: (a) the geometry solved; (b) S=0.5; (c) S=1.0; and (d) S=1.5.
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pressure distribution and temperature rise at y=0 for a patch of sinusoidal roughness moving through the circular contact zone with U=625 mm/s. In pressure profiles, solid line is for thermal solution and dash line for isothermal solution. On temperature curves, the open circles correspond to the temperature rises on upper surfaces in contact and open squares correspond to that on lower surface while the dash lines indicate the solutions from corresponding smooth EHL contacts: (a) the geometry solved; (b) S=0.6; and (c) S=1.6.
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Sinusoidal surface U=625 mm/sLoad=800 N: (a) S=0.6; and (b) S=2.0.
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Three-dimensional displays of pressure and temperature for the case (a) in Fig. 7.

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