0
TECHNICAL PAPERS

On the Frictional Heating in Single Summit Contacts: Towards Failure at Asperity Level in Lubricated Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
E. van der Heide

TNO Industrial Technology, PO Box 6235, 5600 HE, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

D. J. Schipper

University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede, The Netherlands

J. Tribol 126(2), 275-280 (Apr 19, 2004) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1645872 History: Received January 21, 2003; Revised July 10, 2003; Online April 19, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Frewing,  J. J., 1943, “The Heat of Adsorption of Long-Chain Compounds and Their Effect on Boundary Lubrication,” Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A, 182, pp. 270–285.
Blok,  H., 1963, “The Flash Temperature Concept,” Wear, 6, pp. 483–494.
Spikes,  H. A., and Cameron,  A., 1973, “Scuffing as a Desorption Process—An Explanation of the Borsoff Effect,” ASLE Trans., 17(2), pp. 92–96.
Blok, H., 1969, “The Postulate About the Constancy of Scoring Temperature, in Interdisciplinary Approach to Friction and Wear,” in Interdisciplinary Approach to the Lubrication of Concentrated Contacts, P. M. Ku, ed., NASA SP-237, pp. 153–248.
Bos, J., 1995, “Frictional Heating of Tribological Contacts,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.
Bos,  J., and Moes,  H., 1995, “Frictional Heating of Tribological Contacts,” ASME J. Tribol., 117, pp. 171–177.
van der Heide, E., 2002, “Lubricant Failure in Sheet Metal Forming Processes,” Ph.D thesis University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.
Carslaw, H. S., and Jeager, J. C., 1959, Conduction of Heat in Solids, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Metselaar,  H. S. C., Kerwijk,  B., Mulder,  E. J., Verweij,  H., and Schipper,  D. J., 2002, “Wear of Ceramics Due to Thermal Stress: A Thermal Severity Parameter,” Wear, 249, pp. 962–970.
Hokkirigawa,  K., and Kato,  K., 1988, “An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Ploughing, Cutting and Wedge Formation During Abrasive Wear,” Tribol. Int., 21(1), pp. 51–57.
Challen,  J. M., and Oxley,  P. L. B., 1979, “An Explanation of the Different Regimes of Friction and Wear Using Asperity Deformation Models,” Wear, 53, pp. 229–243.
Rooij, M. B. de, 1998, “Tribological Aspects of Unlubricated Deepdrawing Processes,” Ph.D. thesis, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.
Bowden, F. P., and Tabor, D., 1950, The Friction and Lubrication of Solids, Claredon Press, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
Moes,  H., 1992, “Optimum Similarity Analysis With Applications to Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication,” Wear, 159, pp. 57–66.
Greenwood,  J. A., and Willamson,  J. B. P., 1966, “Contact of Nominally Flat Surfaces,” Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A, 295, pp. 300–319.
Xie,  Y., and Williams,  J. A., 1996, “The Prediction of Friction and Wear When a Soft Surface Slides Against a Harder Rough Surface,” Wear, 196, pp. 21–34.
Andreasen, J. L., Eriksen M., and Bay, N., 1997, “Major Process Parameters Affecting Limits of Lubrication in Deep Drawing of Stainless Steel,” Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tribology in Manufacturing Processes ’97, K. Dohda, T. Nakamura, and W. R. D. Wilson, eds., Gifu University, Gifu, Japan, pp. 122–127.
Glaeser, W. A., 1992, Materials for Tribology, Tribology series 20, Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Sliding contact for a single summit
Grahic Jump Location
Wear mode as a function of the dimensionless shear strength fHK and the attack angle θ 10
Grahic Jump Location
Nondimensional flash temperature as a function of the attack angle, plotted for fHK-values: 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7
Grahic Jump Location
Effect of the nondimensional conductivity and velocity on the nondimensional flash temperature (θ=0.55, fHK=0.6)
Grahic Jump Location
Multi-asperity contact between a rigid (tool) surface and a plastically deforming (sheet) surface
Grahic Jump Location
Summit radius as a function of the attack angle for the ground surfaces
Grahic Jump Location
Summit radius as a function of the attack angle for the surfaces with Ra=0.8 μm
Grahic Jump Location
Flash temperature as a function of the attack angle for the Ra=0.8 μm, ground surface. The calculations are made based upon the input given in Table 1.
Grahic Jump Location
Flash temperature as a function of the attack angle for the Ra=0.05 μm, ground surface. The calculations are made based upon the input given in Table 1.
Grahic Jump Location
Maximum local surface temperature rise as a function of the conductivity and of the Ra roughness (surface grinding, Rugotest 104) of the stationary surface

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In