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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Non-Newtonian Thermal Analyses of Point EHL Contacts Using the Eyring Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaoling Liu, Ming Jiang, Peiran Yang

School of Mechanical Engineering, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033, People’s Republic of China

Motohiro Kaneta

Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu 804-8550, Japan

J. Tribol 127(1), 70-81 (Feb 07, 2005) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1843161 History: Received March 21, 2003; Revised October 05, 2004; Online February 07, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Distributions of the dimensionless pressure P and the dimensionless film thickness H given by an Eyring fluid thermal EHL solution in a steel-steel point contact. ξ=1.0, Ue=1.0×10−11,G=5000,W=3.0×10−6 (pH=1.2 GPa), and τ0=10 MPa: (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) comparisons of pressure and film thickness profile between Newtonian and Eyring fluid.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparison of the dimensionless temperature distributions on the plane of Y=0 between the non-Newtonian solution shown in Fig. 1 and the corresponding Newtonian solution: (a) non-Newtonian temperature; and (b) Newtonian temperature
Grahic Jump Location
Effects of the characteristic shear stress τ0 on the midplane pressure, film thickness and temperature. ξ=1.0, Ue=1.0×10−11,G=5000, and W=3.0×10−6 (pH=1.2 GPa): (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) temperature in the lubricant layer of Z=0.6
Grahic Jump Location
Variations of the traction coefficient and the highest film temperature versus the characteristic shear stress. ξ=1.0, Ue=1.0×10−11,G=5000, and W=3.0×10−6 (pH=1.2 GPa).
Grahic Jump Location
Effects of the maximum Hertzian contact pressure on the pressure, film thickness, and film temperature distributions on the plane of symmetry in circular contacts; τ0=10 MPa, ξ=1.0, Ue=1.0×10−11, and G=5000: (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) temperature in the lubricant layer of Z=0.6
Grahic Jump Location
Variations of the traction coefficient, the highest film temperature, and the minimum and central film thickness versus the maximum Hertzian pressure; τ0=10 MPa, ξ=1.0, Ue=1.0×10−11, and G=5000: (a) the traction coefficient and the highest film temperature; and (b) the minimum and central film thickness
Grahic Jump Location
Distributions of pressure, film thickness, and film temperature on the plane of Y=0 with various velocity parameters; τ0=10 MPa, ξ=1.0, G=5000, and W=3.0×10−6 (pH=1.2 GPa): (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) oil temperature at Z=0.6
Grahic Jump Location
Variations of the traction coefficient, the highest film temperature, and the minimum and central film thickness versus the velocity parameter; τ0=10 MPa, ξ=1.0, G=5000, and W=3.0×10−6 (pH=1.2 GPa): (a) the traction coefficient and the highest film temperature; and (b) the minimum and central film thickness
Grahic Jump Location
Effects of the slide-roll ratio on the pressure, film thickness, and film temperature on the plane of Y=0,τ0=10 MPa,Ue=1.0×10−11,G=5000, and W=3.0×10−6 (pH=1.2 GPa): (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) oil temperature at Z=0.6
Grahic Jump Location
Variations of the traction coefficient and the highest film temperature versus the slide-roll ratio for the Eyring (τ0=10 MPa) and Newtonian models. Ue=1.0×10−11, and G=5000: (a) traction coefficient; and (b) the highest oil temperature.
Grahic Jump Location
Comparisons of the pressure, film thickness and temperature profiles between the Newtonian and non-Newtonian (τ0=10 MPa) fluids on the plane of Y=0,pH=0.5 GPa,G=5000,U0=1.0×10−11, and Ua=2.5. Numbers 1, 2, and 3 stand for ξ=3.0, 8.0, and 48.0, respectively: (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) oil temperature at Z=0.5
Grahic Jump Location
Effects of the characteristic shear stress on the pressure, film thickness, and temperature profiles on the plane of Y=0;pH=0.5 GPa,G=5000,U0=1.0×10−11,Ua=2.5, and Ub=−2.3 (ξ=48.0): (a) pressure; (b) film thickness; and (c) oil temperature at Z=0.5
Grahic Jump Location
Contact between normally crossing cylinders: (a) geometry of cylinders; and (b) the contact ellipse
Grahic Jump Location
Solutions of the normally crossing cylinders, pH=1.0 GPa,Ue=3.54×10−11,G=3503,ke=2.5: (a) θ=15 deg; (b) θ=45 deg and (c) θ=75 deg. The first line shows the contour maps of the film thickness; the second line the pressure and film thickness profiles at Y=0; the third line the pressure and film thickness profiles at X=0; and the last line the temperature surface at Z=0.5.

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