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Article

Quantifying Multidirectional Sliding Motions in Total Knee Replacements

[+] Author and Article Information
M. A. Hamilton, M. C. Sucec, B. J. Fregly

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

S. A. Banks

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 Orthopaedic Research Lab, The Biomotion Foundation, Palm Beach, FL 33480

W. G. Sawyer

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611e-mail: wgsawyer@ufl.edu

J. Tribol 127(2), 280-286 (Apr 07, 2005) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1843136 History: Received January 24, 2003; Revised March 10, 2004; Online April 07, 2005
Copyright © 2005 by ASME
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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
A series of simple intensity maps for elliptical contacts of varying aspect ratio
Grahic Jump Location
A series of intensity maps with corresponding counterface motion and normalized crossing severity index for the combined rotating and translating pin geometry 4. The nomenclature is α is an extreme value half-angle for the slip velocity vectors, P is contact pressure, ω is the angular velocity of the pin, R is the pin radius, and V is the translating speed of the pin. The pin is made of UHMWPE and is sliding on a flat polished counterface. The equivalent counterface motions are relative to a differential element on the edge of the pin.
Grahic Jump Location
A series of intensity maps with corresponding counterface motion and normalized crossing severity index for figure eight motion paths. In this model the pin is stationary and the counterface moves in the prescribed pattern beneath the pin.
Grahic Jump Location
Component design and film strips of the kinematics for the gait and stair rise activities. The corresponding locus plots of contact pressure centroid are shown to the far right. The five poses at different times through an activity cycle clearly show the rotations of the femoral component about the surface normal of the UHMWPE tibial bearing.
Grahic Jump Location
Overlaying plots of velocity vectors, normalized by the largest velocity vector in the simulation, onto the corresponding elements on the tibial mesh. These vectors are from a stair-rise activity, which shows the greatest degree of crossing motion.
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Vector plot of the counterface slip velocities at a particular location in the lateral compartment for 17 different instances during stair rise (vectors are numbered in chronological order). This location had a fairly typical motion profile. (b) The motion path of the femoral component over this location. Notice the medial-lateral axis is exaggerated by 20 times, with a 1-to-1 motion path shown to the right; the arrow heads are uniformly spaced in time.
Grahic Jump Location
(a) Vector plot for tribological intensities shown with the angular coordinate convention. (b) Overlaying plot with angular coordinate. (c) Scatter plot of tribological intensity versus angular coordinate compared with unidirectional motion (delta function) and multidirectional motion defined by the circular path (step function).
Grahic Jump Location
A series of simple bidirectional intensity maps, with corresponding counterface motion and normalized crossing intensity σ*
Grahic Jump Location
A series of intensity maps, with corresponding counterface motion and normalized crossing severity index for the experiments conducted in Ref. 8. The central point on the UHMWPE pin is analyzed. The observed path is on the counterface, and the curved paths are the equivalent paths for a nonrotating pin.
Grahic Jump Location
Plots of the experimental data from Ref. 8 (a) versus the ratio of the secondary perpendicular motion to the total motion for a rectangular path, and (b) versus the normalized crossing intensity σ* as calculated in Fig. 6
Grahic Jump Location
Contour maps of (a) tribological intensity and (b) normalized crossing intensity σ* defined for elements in contact during gait plotted over the projected areas of the tibial bearing compartments
Grahic Jump Location
Contour maps of (a) tribological intensity and (b) normalized crossing intensity σ* for elements in contact during stair rise plotted over the projected areas of the tibial bearing compartments

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