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RESEARCH PAPERS

Prediction of Fretting Fatigue Behavior of Metals Using a Fracture Mechanics Approach with Special Consideration to the Contact Problem

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Helmi Attia

Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council of Canada, and Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

J. Tribol 127(4), 685-693 (Apr 08, 2003) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2000265 History: Received April 11, 2002; Revised April 08, 2003

A fracture mechanics model has been developed to estimate the fretting fatigue strength and the service life of structural components. Integrated in this model is a contact problem solver that is automated to deal with the geometric and material nonlinearities of the problem. A three-dimensional interface element was developed to model the constitutive laws of the interface. The results demonstrated the capability of the model to predict the conditions under which small fretting-induced fatigue cracks are arrested. The model was validated by predicting the S-N curves produced experimentally for Inconel 600 at high temperature. The prediction of the fretting fatigue limit was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Effect of contact pressure on the stiffness of the interface in the normal and shear directions, for cn=0.65, m=0.5, M=0.75, and s=0.5

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Figure 2

Interface element in relation to the local and global coordinate systems

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Figure 3

Flow chart for solving the nonlinear contact problem

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Figure 4

Cracked body subject to point load and distributed contact stresses

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Figure 5

Effect of the stress factor ratio R on the threshold stress intensity range ΔKth

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Figure 6

S-N curves obtained experimentally for Inconel-600 at 265°C and different levels of mean stress σm and contact pressure pc

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Figure 7

Fretting fatigue test specimen and wear pads: (a) finite element idealization and (b) close-up of the experimental setup

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Figure 8

Effect of the applied stress σa and the crack length a on the stress intensity factor KI for contact pressure pc=69MPa, mean stress σm=0, and μ=0.55

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Figure 9

Determination of fretting fatigue limit and conditions for nongrowing cracks: contact pressure pc=69MPa, mean stress σm=0, and μ=0.55

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Figure 10

Comparison between the fracture mechanics life predictions and the experimental S-N results, for I-600 at 265°C, pc=69MPa, and σm=0

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Figure 11

Crack propagation behavior for different levels of applied stress σa during fretting fatigue of I-600 at 265°C (pc=69MPa,σm=0,μ=0.15)

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Figure 12

Fretting fatigue failure criteria of I-600 at 265°C (pc=69MPa,σm=0,μ=0.15)

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Figure 13

Comparison between the fracture mechanics life predictions and experimental S-N results for I-600 at 265°C, pc=138MPa, and σm=0

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Figure 14

Comparison between the fracture mechanics life predictions and experimental S-N results for I-600 at 265°C, pc=138MPa, and σm=138MPa

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