0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Virtual Texturing: Modeling the Performance of Lubricated Contacts of Engineered Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Q. Jane Wang

Mechanical Engineering,  Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208

Dong Zhu

Innovation Center,  Eaton Corporation, Southfield, MI 48076

J. Tribol 127(4), 722-728 (May 26, 2005) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2000273 History: Received February 25, 2004; Revised May 26, 2005

Engineering practices and analyses have indicated that surface textures and topography may significantly affect the tribological performance of contact interfaces. Such an influence may be complicated and difficult to be captured with only a few statistic surface parameters. The need for further improvement of the performance and life of machine elements requires that surface topography and textures be optimized. The utilization of a numerical tool to determine the basic geometric aspects of surface textures may be named a virtual texturing technology, with which surface optimization may start from patterned surfaces where topography can be precisely quantified and the relationship between textures and lubrication performance can be numerically established. Presented in this paper are the concept of the virtual texturing technology, models involved, and a preliminary exploration of the relationship between a dimpled texture design and the mixed lubrication characteristics for a typical counterformal contact. The dimple influence area and the number of interruption are found to be two key factors for designing dimpled surfaces for counterformal contact lubrication. It is demonstrated that virtual texturing is able to provide comparative information and directions for innovative surface design and optimization.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Samples of engineered surfaces. (a) Ground surface (Rq=1.14μm). (b) Shaved surface (Rq=0.89μm). (c) Turned surface (Rq=0.86μm). (d) Honed surface (Rq=0.70μm). (e) Polished surface (Rq=0.30μm). (f) Dimpled surface (Rq=0.23μm).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Logic of the virtual surface texturing technology

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Summary of the results of machined surfaces in mixed lubrication

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

A representative area of the honed surface shown in Fig. 1, and snapshots of the film thickness distribution, pressure distribution, and centerline film thickness, pressure, and subsurface stress solutions. (a) Film thickness distribution, where the light color area is for h∕a<0.000,02. (b) Pressure distribution, where the light color area is for P∕Ph>1.1. (c) Centerline film thickness, pressure, and the Mises stress.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

A representative area of the honed surface No. 2, and snapshots of the film thickness distribution, pressure distribution, and centerline film thickness, pressure, and subsurface stress solutions. (a) Film thickness distribution, where the light color area is for h∕a<0.00002. (b) Pressure distribution, where the light color area is for P∕Ph>1.1. (c) Centerline film thickness, pressure, and the Mises stress. (d) A representative area of another type of the honed surface (Rq=0.46μm).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

A matrix of computer-generated dimpled surface (60×240×240, density: 11.22%). The darkest color in each dimple indicates the deepest region.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Effect of dimple size on film thickness. Sd∕H=1000 dimple area∕Hertzian area. Depth: 3μm, density: 11.2%. (a) Large dimple, the low-speed high-load condition. (b) Large dimple, the high-speed low-load condition. (c) Small dimple, the high-speed low-load condition.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Effect of dimple depth on film thickness. Area ratio: 11.2%. (a) Large dimple, the low-speed high-load condition, 60×240×240. (b) Large dimple, the high-speed low-load condition, 60×240×240. (c) Small dimple, the high-speed low-load condition, 20×80×80.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Effect of dimple density on film thickness. Depth: 3μm. (a) Large dimple, the low-speed high-load condition, 60×240. (b) Large dimple, the high-speed low-load condition, 60×240. (c) Small dimple, the high-speed low-load condition, 20×80.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Film distribution patterns affected by dimple size, depth, and density under the low-speed high-load condition. The light color around dimples indicates contact areas. (a) Film distributions corresponding to different dimple sizes. (b) Film distributions corresponding to different dimple depths. (c) Film distributions corresponding to different dimple densities.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In