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RESEARCH PAPERS

Effects of Lubricants on the Friction and Wear Properties of PTFE and POM

[+] Author and Article Information
H. S. Benabdallah, J. J. Wei

 Royal Military College of Canada, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 17000, Stn Forces, Kingston, Ontario K7K 7B4 Canada

J. Tribol 127(4), 766-775 (May 05, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2005276 History: Received August 19, 2004; Revised May 05, 2005

The friction and wear properties of PTFE and POM were investigated using a ball-on-steel ring tester under dry and lubricated conditions by paraffin and 10W–30 oils. SEM, EDAX, FTIR, and surface wettability techniques were used to characterize and assess the morphology and chemical composition of the original surfaces, as well as the wear track, transfer film, and wear debris at different loads and speeds. Although the friction was high, similar behavior to that reported in the literature was observed. The experimentally determined surface temperature of the plastic revealed optimum loading levels, for each sliding speed, at which the friction and wear rate become a minimum and the thermal effect stabilizes. In boundary-like lubrication using both oils, friction and wear were significantly reduced with the exception of an increase in wear rate with load when POM was lubricated by 10W–30 oil. Surface analysis revealed that the formation of lubricative protective layers on the surfaces in contact is crucial to reducing friction, and more importantly, wear. FTIR results confirmed that film transfer occurs in the case of POM.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic illustration of contact geometry for ball-on-ring tester

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Figure 2

Variation of friction coefficient with sliding time for PTFE (a) and POM (b) at 50 g and 0.514m∕s

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Figure 3

Friction coefficient as function of load for PTFE (a) and POM (b) at 0.514m∕s for 20 min

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Figure 4

Effect of load on the wear volume at 0.514m∕s for 20 min

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Figure 12

SEM photomicrographs of the wear track of steel counterface generated by POM in dry sliding (a), paraffin oil (b), and 10 W–30 oil (c)

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Figure 13

EDAX spectra of wear debris at the trailing edge of POM ball sliding against a bearing steel, showing the existence of Fe and the wear of steel

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Figure 14

FTIR spectra of original POM (above curve) and the wear track of steel counterface (bottom curve)

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Figure 5

Effect of load on wear rate (a) PTFE (b) POM at 0.514m∕s for 20 min

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Figure 6

Effect of speed on the wear rate (a) and PTFE (b) POM at 100 g for 20 min

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Figure 7

Effect of initial contact pressure on the surface temperature reached after 20 min

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Figure 8

Surface temperature reached after 20 min as function of the parameter μPv

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Figure 9

SEM photomicrographs of the wear scar of PTFE in the case of dry sliding (a), lubrication with paraffin oil (b) and 10 W–30 oil (c)

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Figure 10

SEM photomicrographs of the wear scar of POM in the case of dry sliding (a), lubrication with paraffin oil (b) and 10 W–30 oil (c)

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Figure 11

SEM photomicrographs of the wear track of steel counterface generated by PTFE in dry sliding (a), paraffin oil (b), and 10 W–30 oil (c)

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