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RESEARCH PAPERS

Vibration Monitoring and Damage Quantification of Faulty Ball Bearings

[+] Author and Article Information
F. K. Choy

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3903fchoy@uakron.edu

J. Zhou, M. J. Braun

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH 44325-3903

L. Wang

 B&C Engineering Associates, Inc. Akron, OH 44311

J. Tribol 127(4), 776-783 (Jul 05, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2033899 History: Received June 10, 2005; Revised July 05, 2005

More often than not, the rolling element bearings in rotating machinery are the mechanical components that are first prone to premature failure. Early warning of an impending bearing failure is vital to the safety and reliability of high-speed turbomachinery. Presently, vibration monitoring is one of the most applied procedures in on-line damage and failure monitoring of rolling element bearings. This paper presents results from an experimental rotor-bearing test rig with quantified damage induced in the supporting rolling element bearings. Both good and damaged radial and tapered ball bearings are used in this study. The vibration signatures due to damage at the ball elements and the inner race of the bearing are also examined. Vibration signature analyzing schemes such as frequency domain analysis, and chaotic vibration analysis (modified Poincare diagrams) are applied and their effectiveness in pinpoint damage are compared in this study. The size/level of the damage is corroborated with the vibration amplitudes to provide quantification criteria for bearing progressive failure prediction. Based on the results from this study, it is shown that the use of the modified Poincare map, based on the relative carrier speed, can provide an effective way for identification and quantification of bearing damage in rolling element bearings.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Photo of the high-speed ball bearing test rig

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Figure 2

Photo of the damaged bearing (a) inner race damage and (b) ball element damage

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Figure 6

Modified Poincare maps at rotor speed with good and damaged ball bearings

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Figure 7

Modified Poincare maps at cage speed with good and damaged ball bearings

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Figure 8

Frequency spectra for good, No. 0, and damaged, Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 taper ball bearings

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Figure 9

Modified Poincare maps at shaft speed with taper ball bearings

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Figure 10

Modified Poincare maps at cage speed with taper ball bearings

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Figure 11

Relationships between vibration amplitudes from the modified Poincare maps with damage in the inner race of the taper ball bearings

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Figure 5

Frequency spectra of good and damaged ball bearings

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Figure 4

Damage measurement of taper ball bearing Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4

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Figure 3

Photo of damaged 11-ball taper bearing with inner race damage

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