0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Friction Control of Active-Head Slider During Flying Height Adjustment

[+] Author and Article Information
Lizhi Su

Department of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering,  Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japansulizhi@hotmail.com

Junguo Xu, Masayuki Kurita

Storage Technology Research Center, Hitachi, Ltd., Tsuchiura, Ibaraki 300-0013, Japan

Koji Kato, Koshi Adachi

Department of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579, Japan

Yoshihiko Miyake

 Hitachi Global Storage Technologies Japan, Ltd., Odawara, Kanagawa 256-8510, Japan

J. Tribol 127(4), 871-877 (Oct 04, 2004) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2000266 History: Received February 23, 2004; Revised October 04, 2004

To reduce the risk of head crash when a slider contacts a smooth disk during flying height adjustment, a novel tapping method for reducing the friction and lowering the risk of head crash was developed. An active-head slider was designed and fabricated to demonstrate the usefulness of the tapping approach. It is also found that micro-vibration is significantly effective in avoiding a high friction force and protecting a head from the crash due to head-disk contact during the flying height adjustment.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Three-dimensional surface measurement of the model head by Wyko surface profiler

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Flying height as a function of “drive” voltage (dc voltage) at two points: (a) active pad (A) and (b) rear pad (B). The speed is 4200 rpm and the slider is positioned at a disk radius of 29 mm.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

(a) Flying height at active pad under vibration as a function of velocity on glass disk with roughness (Ra) of 0.3 nm. The vibration is 250 kHz sine waveform with amplitude of 13 nm, which was measured when the active-head slider does not fly over the disk surface. (b) Head crash when the active-head slider flies over a disk with averaged surface roughness Ra of 0.3 nm.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Experimental setup: (a) drag tester and (b) holder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Relationship between (a) friction on a disk with Ra of 0.6 nm under various micro-vibration amplitudes and (b) applied load (disk velocity: 80 rpm; vibration frequency: 75 kHz)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Relationship between (a) friction on a disk with Ra of 0.3 nm under various micro-vibration amplitudes and (b) applied load (disk velocity: 80 rpm; vibration frequency: 75 kHz)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Friction force as a function of load under various amplitudes of micro-vibration on two kinds of disk surfaces: (a) Ra: 0.6 nm and (b) Ra: 0.3 nm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Friction force on disks with different surface roughness as a function of vibration amplitude under a 0.25-mN load

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Schematic of an active-head slider that contains four nonactive pads and one active pad

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Head suspension assembly

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Deflection of the actuator bar as a function of drive voltage and actuator length

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Two-dimensional air bearing surface of a fabricated active-head slider measured by Wyko surface profiler

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Deformation of the actuator that is obtained by subtracting initial surface profile (without drive voltage) (a) from end surface profile with minus 15 V drive voltage and (b) from end surface profile with plus 15 V drive voltage. Deformations at the tip of the cantilever are (a) 12 nm and (b) 24 nm, respectively.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Frequency response of fabricated active-head sliders

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Piezoelectric actuator movement measured by laser Doppler vibrometer when the actuator is operated under a sine wave at frequency of 250 kHz (a) at actuator head and (b) at the rear air-bearing pad

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In