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RESEARCH PAPERS

Optimization of Air Bearing Contours for Shock Performance of a Hard Disk Drive

[+] Author and Article Information
Eric M. Jayson, Frank E. Talke

Center for Magnetic Recording Research,  University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093

J. Tribol 127(4), 878-883 (May 11, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2000979 History: Received April 01, 2004; Revised May 11, 2005

Hard disk drives must be designed to withstand shock during operation. Large movements of the slider during a shock impulse can cause reading and writing errors, track misregistration, or in extreme cases, damage to the magnetic material and loss of data. The design of the air bearing contour determines the steady-state flying conditions of the slider as well as dynamic flying conditions, including shock response. In this paper a finite element model of the hard disk drive mechanical components was developed to determine the time dependent forces and moments applied to the slider during a shock event. The time-dependent forces and moments are applied as external loads in a solution of the dynamic Reynolds equation to determine the slider response to a shock event. The genetic algorithm was then used to optimize the air bearing contour for optimum shock response while keeping the steady flying conditions constant. The results show substantial differences in the spacing modulation of the head-disk interface after a shock as a function of the design of the air bearing contour.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Finite element model of head∕disk interface components

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Figure 2

Two sliders analyzed for dynamic shock response

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Figure 3

Response of slider A

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Figure 4

Response of slider B

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Figure 5

Shock impulse and the initial separation used in the objective function

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Figure 6

Design variables used for optimization

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Figure 7

Dynamic response of optimized and original air bearing design

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Figure 8

Optimized and original slider air bearing surface

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Figure 9

Design variables used for additional optimization

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Figure 10

Dynamic response of optimized and original air bearing design

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Figure 11

Optimized and original slider air bearing surface

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