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RESEARCH PAPERS

Effects of Mobile and Bonded Molecules of Molecularly Thin Lubricant Film on the Vibrational Stability of a Sliding Ball

[+] Author and Article Information
Kentaro Tanaka

Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-8533, Japankentaro@e.kaiyodai.ac.jp

Masahiro Kawaguchi

Institute of Mechanical Systems Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, 305-8564, Japan

Takahisa Kato

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656, Japan

Katsumi Iwamoto

Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 2-1-6, Etchujima, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-8533, Japan

J. Tribol 128(1), 176-180 (Aug 18, 2005) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2114967 History: Received February 23, 2004; Revised August 18, 2005

Lubrication by an extremely thin film has become very important in micromachines, magnetic recording disks, and so on. Molecularly thin perfluoropolyether (PFPE) films are considered a good lubricant for these micro devices. When the thickness of the PFPE film is thinned to several nanometers, it is possible to assume that the film consists of mobile and bonded molecules. In this paper, we investigated the role of these molecules from the viewpoint of the vibrational stability of the sliding ball with the disk surface. From experiments by the ball on disk type tribotester, it is found that both mobile and bonded molecules exist on the disk surface, the bouncing vibration of the sliding ball can be reduced wide load range. In the case where only mobile or only bonded molecules exists, there is little effect on the bouncing vibration.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Measurement system

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Figure 2

Parallel link suspension

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Figure 3

Sv as a function of load

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Figure 4

Vibration of head with load: (a) 50μN, (b) 109μN, (c) 494μN, (d) 998μN

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Figure 5

Load dependence of (a) Sv and (b) friction force for non-lubricated disk

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Figure 6

Load dependence of (a) Sv and (b) friction force for B=0.0

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Figure 7

Load dependence of (a) Sv and (b) friction force for B=0.37

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Figure 8

Load dependence of (a) Sv and (b) friction force for B=0.75

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Figure 9

Load dependence of (a) Sv and (b) friction force for B=1.0

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Figure 10

Frequency analyses of head slider vibration for (a) non-lubricated, (b) B=0.0, (c) B=0.37, (d) B=0.75, (e) B=1.0

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