0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Effect of Intermolecular Forces on the Static and Dynamic Performance of Air Bearing Sliders: Part II—Dependence of the Stability on Hamaker Constant, Suspension Preload and Pitch Angle

[+] Author and Article Information
Vineet Gupta

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720vineet@cml.me.berkeley.edu

David B. Bogy

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720dbogy@cml.me.berkeley.ed

J. Tribol 128(1), 203-208 (May 05, 2005) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2000270 History: Received February 24, 2004; Revised May 05, 2005

Intermolecular and surface forces contribute significantly to the total forces acting on air bearing sliders for flying heights below 5 nm. Their contributions to the total force increase sharply with the reduction in flying height, and hence their existence can no longer be ignored in air bearing simulation for hard disk drives. Various experimentally observed dynamic instabilities can be explained by the inclusion of these forces in the model for low flying sliders. In this paper parametric studies are presented using a 3-DOF model to better understand the effect of the Hamaker constants, suspension pre load and pitch angle on the dynamic stability/instability of the sliders. A stiffness matrix is used to characterize the stability in the vertical, pitch, and roll directions. The fly height diagrams are used to examine the multiple equilibriums that exist for low flying heights. It has been found that the system instability increases as the magnitude of the van der Waals force increases. It has also been found that higher suspension pre load and higher pitch angles tend to stabilize the system.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Fly height diagram

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Pico slider with a crown of 30 nm and a camber of −5 nm. The base recess is 1.397 1.397μm.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Fly height diagram with different values of Hamaker constant

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Fly height diagram for slider shown in Fig. 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Pitch versus fly height for slider shown in Fig. 2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Pico slider with a crown of 25.4 nm and a camber of 2.5 nm. The base recess is 2.5μm. Femto slider with a crown of 17 nm and a camber of 2 nm. The base recess is 2.3μm.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Fly height diagrams for pico and femto slider designs at different suspension preloads

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Pitch versus fly height for sliders shown in Fig. 6

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Fly height diagrams for pico slider design (Fig. 2) at different suspension preloads

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Pitch versus fly height for sliders in Fig. 2 at different suspension preloads

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Related

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In