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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Compressibility of Oil/Refrigerant Lubricants in Elasto-Hydrodynamic Contacts

[+] Author and Article Information
Roger Tuomas

Division of Machine Elements, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Swedenroger.tuomas@ltu.se

Ove Isaksson

Division of Machine Elements, Luleå University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleå, Sweden

J. Tribol 128(1), 218-220 (Sep 17, 2005) (3 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2125967 History: Received February 28, 2005; Revised September 17, 2005

A high-pressure chamber is used to study lubricant compressibility when refrigeration oil is diluted by refrigerant. The tested lubricant in this work is a POE (polyol ester) oil, POE diluted with nonchlorinated (HFC) refrigerant R-134a, a naphthenic mineral oil, and the mineral oil diluted with the chlorinated (HCFC) refrigerant R-22. The high-pressure chamber experiments show that by adding 20 wt% of R-134a to the polyol ester oil, the stiffness of the lubricant increases by approximately 38 wt% at 1 GPa and is much higher than for R-22 and mineral oil.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) An overview of the high-pressure chamber. (b) High pressure cylinder and the two plungers.

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Figure 2

(a) Compressibility as function of pressure, for pure mineral oil and mineral oil diluted with 20 wt% R-22. (b) Compressibility as function of pressure, for pure POE and POE diluted with 20 wt% R-134a

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Figure 3

Comparison of models regarding relative density as a function of pressure. The figure shows the Jacobson-Vinet model fitted to measurement data.

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