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RESEARCH PAPERS

An Experimental Study on the Impact of Interface Temperature on Thermally Induced Wear Transitions in Dry Sliding

[+] Author and Article Information
Daryl S. Schneider

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bearings and Seals Laboratory, University of Kentucky, 151 Ralph G. Anderson Building, Lexington, KY 40506-0503dsschn0@engr.uky.edu

Lyndon S. Stephens

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bearings and Seals Laboratory, University of Kentucky, 151 Ralph G. Anderson Building, Lexington, KY 40506-0503

Modified Falex Multi-Specimen Friction and Wear Test Machine.

J. Tribol 128(3), 460-468 (Jan 03, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2197841 History: Received September 23, 2005; Revised January 03, 2006

Premature failure of materials in sliding contact is often a result of the buildup of frictional heat at the contact interface. The interface temperature is an important parameter affecting the friction and wear process, and it is a function of the operating conditions as well as the heat that is dissipated through the material pair and the nearby surroundings. Possible solutions to alleviate thermal wear mechanisms include using more thermally robust materials and providing better cooling or heat dissipation to reduce the elevated temperatures. The latter is the subject of this paper. The micro heat sink ring (μHSR) is a patented approach to interface cooling in which a micro heat sink is constructed within millimeters of the contact interface. The ramifications of this are that temperature can be treated during wear testing as an independent variable and is only a very small function of speed and load. Using this approach, this work investigates the impact of the μHSR on the wear behavior of a tungsten carbide and carbon graphite material pair under dry running conditions at various rotational speeds and face pressures. Ring-on-ring experiments are performed using a thrust washer rotary tribometer within and in excess of the PV limit of the material pair (17.5MPa*ms). Results show the potential of the μHSR to allow for reliable operation of materials in sliding contact in harsh operating conditions. The ability to reduce the interface temperature shows a shift in the region of acceptable operating parameters normally defined for the material pair. This shift is attributed to the prevention of the onset of thermally induced wear transitions and thermal failures otherwise prone to occur under certain operating conditions.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The micro heat sink ring (μHSR)(25)

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Figure 2

Schematic of experimental apparatus

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Figure 3

Temperatures via embedded thermocouples, test #1

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Figure 4

Temperatures via embedded thermocouples, test #10

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Figure 5

Carbon wear rate versus speed for various mean face pressures

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Figure 6

Carbon wear rate versus mean face pressure for various speeds

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Figure 7

Carbon wear rate versus temperature of rotary near interface

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Figure 8

SEM image of a thermocracked region (×900)

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Figure 9

SEM image of thermocracked region of Fig. 8(×2000)

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Figure 10

Excerpt of temperature profile at high PV without coolant

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Figure 11

2-D axisymmetric FEM near contact interface

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Figure 12

Carbon wear rate versus interface temperature

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Figure 13

(a) Interface temperature map (°C) for tests with interface cooling (μHSR). (b) Wear map (μm∕h) for tests with interface cooling (μHSR).

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Figure 14

(a) Interface temperature map (°C) for tests without interface cooling (solid ring). (b) Wear map (μm∕h) for tests without interface cooling (solid ring).

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Figure 15

Summary of generated and dissipated heat for tests utilizing the μHSR

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