0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Effect of Roughness Parameter and Grinding Angle on Coefficient of Friction When Sliding of Al–Mg Alloy Over EN8 Steel

[+] Author and Article Information
Pradeep L. Menezes, Kishore

Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India

Satish V. Kailas

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, Indiasatvk@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in

J. Tribol 128(4), 697-704 (Apr 29, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345401 History: Received June 25, 2005; Revised April 29, 2006

Surface topography of harder mating surface plays an important role in metal forming operations as it predominantly controls the frictional behavior at the interface. In the present investigation, an inclined scratch tester was used to understand the effect of direction of surface grinding marks on interface friction and transfer layer formation. EN8 steel flats were ground to attain different surface roughnesses with unidirectional grinding marks. Al–Mg alloy pins were then scratched against the prepared EN8 steel flats. The grinding angle (angle between direction of scratch and grinding marks) was varied between 0 deg and 90 deg during the scratch tests. Scanning electron micrography of the contact surfaces revealed the transfer layer morphology. The coefficient of friction and transfer layer formation were observed to depend primarily on the direction of grinding marks of the harder mating surface, and independent of the surface roughness of harder mating surface. The grinding angle effect was attributed to the variation of plowing component of friction with grinding angle.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Three-dimensional image of unidirectional ground EN8 steel flat. (b) Schematic diagram of EN8 steel flat surface with unidirectional grinding marks. Arrow indicates the sliding direction of the pin, which makes an angle of 0 deg, 45 deg, or 90 deg to the unidirectional grinding marks during sliding.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Variation of force with sliding distance (grinding angle=90deg)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Variation of coefficient of friction with sliding distance (grinding angle=90deg)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Variation of coefficient of friction with sliding distance (grinding angle=0deg)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Variation of coefficient of friction with grinding angle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

SEM micrographs of pin surface slid on EN8 flat at 0 deg grinding angle with Ra=0.1382μm under (a) dry and (b) lubricated conditions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Variation of coefficient of friction with grinding angle

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Backscattered scanning electron micrographs of EN8 steel flats under dry and lubricated conditions at different grinding angles with (a), (e) Ra=0.2237μm, (b), (f) Ra=0.2505μm, (c), (g) Ra=0.2145μm, and (d), (h) Ra=0.1382μm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Variation of coefficient of friction with sliding distance (grinding angle=90deg)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic diagram of scratch testing machine and inclined sample

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In