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RESEARCH PAPERS

Finite Element Analysis of Thermoelastodynamic Instability Involving Frictional Heating

[+] Author and Article Information
Yun-Bo Yi

Department of Engineering, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208

J. Tribol 128(4), 718-724 (Apr 30, 2006) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345412 History: Received January 17, 2006; Revised April 30, 2006

A finite element method is used to solve the problem involving thermoelastodynamic instability (TEDI) in frictional sliding systems. The resulting matrix equation contains a complex eigenvalue that represents the exponential growth rate of temperature, displacement, and velocity fields. Compared to the thermoelastic instability (TEI) in which eigenmodes always decay with time when the sliding speed is below a critical value, numerical results from TEDI have shown that some of the modes always grow in the time domain at any sliding speed. As a result, when the inertial effect is considered, the phenomenon of hot spotting can actually occur at a sliding speed below the critical TEI threshold. The finite element method presented here has obvious advantages over analytical approaches and transient simulations of the problem in that the stabilities of the system can be determined for an arbitrary geometry without extensive computations associated with analytical expressions of the contact condition or numerical iterations in the time domain.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the computational model: (a) An elastic layer sliding against a rigid, nonconducting body (the single-material model); (b) a layer sliding between two elastic and conducting layers (the multi-material model)

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Figure 2

Biased mesh for modeling the thermal skin layer in the friction material (poor conductor)

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Figure 3

Real part of the growth rate for dominant eigenmode as a function of dimensionless sliding speed in the single-material model (Fig. 1); m=0

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Figure 4

Real part of the growth rate for dominant eigenmode as a function of sliding speed assuming the antisymmetric boundary condition (multi-material model)

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Figure 5

Real part of the growth rate for dominant eigenmode as a function of sliding speed assuming the symmetric boundary condition (multi-material model)

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Figure 6

Comparison of maximum growth rate as a function of wave number m between TEI and TEDI at sliding speed V=10m∕s (above critical TEI speed). Multi-material model under antisymmetric boundary condition is used here.

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Figure 7

Profile of temperature eigenvector across the thickness of model for the leading mode under antisymmetric boundary conditions. The wave number m is 200(m−1).

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Figure 8

Profile of displacement/velocity eigenvectors across the thickness of model for the dominant mode assuming the antisymmetric boundary condition. m=200(m−1).

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Figure 9

Profile of temperature eigenvector across the thickness of model for the dominant mode assuming the symmetric boundary condition. m=200(m−1).

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Figure 10

Profile of displacement/velocity eigenvectors across the model thickness for the dominant mode assuming the symmetric boundary conditions. m=200(m−1).

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