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RESEARCH PAPERS

Roughness Amplitude Reduction Under Non-Newtonian EHD Lubrication Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
A. D. Chapkov, A. A. Lubrecht

 LaMCoS, INSA Lyon, UMR CNRS 5514, France

C. H. Venner

 University of Twente, The Netherlands

J. Tribol 128(4), 753-760 (Jun 13, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345398 History: Received May 12, 2005; Revised June 13, 2006

Over the last decade, the operating conditions of the Elastohydrodynamic lubricated (EHL) contact have become increasingly severe. Consequently, the average film thickness decreased and became comparable to the surface roughness. Under those conditions, the surface features can reduce the minimum film thickness and can thus increase wear. They can also increase the temperature and the pressure fluctuations, which directly affect the component life. In order to describe the roughness geometry inside an EHL contact, the amplitude reduction of harmonic waviness has been studied over the last decade. This theory currently allows a quantitative prediction of the waviness amplitude and includes the influence of wavelength and contact operating conditions. However, the model assumes a Newtonian behavior of the lubricant. The current paper contributes to the extension of the roughness amplitude reduction for EHL point contacts including non-Newtonian effects. A generalized model is derived that includes both types of behavior.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Computed profiles as a function of X, Y=0, M=500, L=10, S=0.05, τ0=1MPa, λ=0.25. The solid line denotes the non-Newtonian case and the dotted line the Newtonian case. (a) Pressure. (b) Film thickness.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Computed profiles as a function of X, Y=0. M=500, L=10, S=0.05, τ0=1MPa, Ai=0.15Hc, λ=0.25. The solid line denotes the non-Newtonian case and the dotted line the Newtonian case. (a) Pressure fluctuations. (b) Deformation fluctuations.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Comparison between the amplitude reduction for both types of behavior as a function of X, Y=0. M=500, L=10, S=0.05, τ0=1MPa, Ai=0.15Hc, (from top to bottom) λ=0.25, λ=0.50, λ=0.75. The solid line denotes the non-Newtonian model and the dotted line the Newtonian model.

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Figure 4

Amplitude reduction curve along X, Y=0. M=500, L=10, S=0.05, τ0=1MPa, Ai=0.15Hc, (from top to bottom) λ=0.25, λ=0.50, λ=0.75. The solid line denotes the non-Newtonian model, the dotted line the Newtonian model and the + symbol (Eq. 30).

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Amplitude reduction curve plotted using ∇ (Eq. 32)

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Figure 6

Amplitude reduction curve plotted using ∇¯ (Eq. 34)

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Figure 7

Amplitude reduction curve plotted using ∇ (Eq. 32), large λ∕b and τ0 values

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