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RESEARCH PAPERS

Dynamic Finite Element Simulations for Understanding Wheel-Rail Contact Oscillatory States Occurring Under Sliding Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Saulot

 Laboratoire de Mécanique des Contacts et des Solides, UMR CNRS – INSA 5514, INSA de Lyon, 69621 Villeurbanne, Cedex, Franceaurelien.saulot@insa-lyon.fr

L. Baillet

Laboratoire de Géophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, UMR CNRS – UJF, Université Joseph Fourier, 38041 Grenoble, Cedex 9 BP 53, France

J. Tribol 128(4), 761-770 (Apr 25, 2006) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345402 History: Received July 09, 2005; Revised April 25, 2006

This paper presents a temporal study using dynamic finite element methods of the dynamic response of a 2D mechanical model composed of a deformable rotating disk (wheel) in contact with a deformable translating body (rail) with constant Coulomb friction. Under global sliding conditions, oscillatory states at specific frequencies occur in the contact patch even in the case of a constant friction coefficient. A parallel is drawn between the frequencies of these states and the modal analysis of the entire mechanical model. The influence on local contact conditions of parameters such as normal load, global sliding ratio, friction coefficient, and the transient value for applying sliding conditions is then evaluated. Finally, the consequences of these states on local rail plastic deformation are presented and correlated with rail corrugation occurring on straight tracks under acceleration and deceleration conditions.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Model and boundary conditions of the 2D mechanical model

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Figure 2

Evolution of normal load FverticalWheel and global sliding ratio ΓimposedG imposed at the center of the wheel versus time

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Figure 3

Evolution of (a) global tangential contact force FtangG and (b) global frictional power PfG at the interface between the two bodies throughout the simulation

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Figure 4

Evolution of (a) local shear stress σshearnode(i), (b) local relative sliding velocity Vslidingnode(i), and (c) local frictional power Pfnode(i) at Nentry, Nmiddle, and Nexit

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Figure 5

Both (a) free and (b) coupled model with boundary conditions used for modal analysis

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Figure 6

Influence of the global sliding ratio ΓimposedG on the evolution of (a) global tangential contact force FtangG and (b) global frictional power PfG throughout the simulation

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Figure 7

Influence of the transient value for applying sliding conditions on the evolution of (a) global tangential contact force FtangG and (b) global frictional power PfG throughout the simulation

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Figure 8

Influence of the friction coefficient μ on the evolution of (a) global tangential contact force FtangG and (b) global frictional power PfG throughout the simulation

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Figure 9

Influence of the normal load FverticalWheel on the evolution of (a) global tangential contact force FtangG and (b) global frictional power PfG throughout the simulation

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Figure 10

Simulation results using the high yield stress elastic - plastic law for the rail material: (a1 and a2) with ΓimposedG=20% applied in 0.1ms, (b) pure rolling conditions, and (c) with ΓimposedG=20% in stabilized conditions

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Figure 11

Simulation results using the low yield stress elastic - plastic law for the rail material with ΓimposedG=5% applied in 0.1ms

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