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RESEARCH PAPERS

The Stribeck Curve: Experimental Results and Theoretical Prediction

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaobin Lu

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2508 CEBA, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

M. M. Khonsari1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 2508 CEBA, Baton Rouge, LA 70803khonsari@me.lsu.edu

E. R. Gelinck

 TNO, Material Technology Division, Tribology Group, P.O. Box 6235, 5600 HE Eindhoven, The Netherlands

1

Please direct all communications to the attention of Professor Khonsari.

J. Tribol 128(4), 789-794 (Apr 11, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345406 History: Received August 20, 2005; Revised April 11, 2006

The Stribeck curve plays an important role in identifying boundary, mixed, elastohydrodynamic, and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes. Recent advances in elastohydrodynamic lubrication together with rough surface interaction have made it possible to develop a methodology for predicting the trend of the Stribeck curve. In this paper, we report the results of a series of experiments performed on a journal bearing together with a theoretical prediction of the Stribeck-type behavior. Various loads and oil temperatures are considered. The comparison between the experimental results with a mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication model for line contacts is indicative of good agreement.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The Stribeck curve

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Figure 2

Schematic of the friction apparatus (not to scale) 1—Guiding poles; 2—load cell; 3—base; 4—linkage bar; 5—housing; 6—shaft; 7—lip seal; 8—computer system; 9—load applying device; 10—lubrication system

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Figure 3

Effect of inlet oil temperature on the friction coefficient plotted as a function of velocity, experiment

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Figure 4

The friction coefficient as a function of the Sommerfeld number (oil temperature: 40°C)

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Figure 5

The friction coefficient as a function of the Sommerfeld number (oil temperature: 50°C)

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Figure 6

The friction coefficient as a function of the Sommerfeld number (oil temperature: 60°C)

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Figure 7

The film thickness parameter as a function of the Sommerfeld number, 667N load, 40°C oil

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Figure 8

Effect of load on the friction coefficient plotted as a function of velocity, experiment, 40°C oil

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Figure 9

Effect of load on the friction coefficient as a function of the Sommerfeld number

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