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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Influence of Wear on the Behavior of a Two-Lobe Hydrodynamic Journal Bearing Subjected to Numerous Startups and Stops

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Bouyer1

Laboratory of Solid Mechanics, University of Poitiers, UMR CNRS 6610, SP2MI, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex, Francebouyer@lms.univ-poitiers.fr

M. Fillon

Laboratory of Solid Mechanics, University of Poitiers, UMR CNRS 6610, SP2MI, Boulevard Marie et Pierre Curie BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex, France

I. Pierre-Danos

Acoustics and Mechanical Analyses Department, EDF R&D, 1 avenue du général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 129(1), 205-208 (Jul 03, 2006) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2401210 History: Received March 24, 2006; Revised July 03, 2006

The behavior of the hydrodynamic journal bearings is now very well known because of the many experimental and numerical studies that have been carried out on the topic. This interest in two-lobe journal bearings is due to the fact that their simplicity, efficiency, and low cost have led to them being widely used in industry. These mechanical components tend to be subjected to numerous startups and stops. During transient periods, direct contact between the journal and bearing induces high friction in the lubricated contact and hence wear of the lining. The aim of this work is, first, to present experimental data obtained on a journal lobed bearing subjected to numerous starts and stops. Then, a comparison is made between the measured bearing performance and numerical results, these being obtained on the assumption that the regime is a thermohydrodynamic one. The wear after more than 2000 cycles was measured and used to generate numerical simulations. The aim here was to compare experimental data with theoretical results. It was observed that hydrodynamic pressure increases, whereas the temperature at the film/bush interface slightly decreases on both the upper and lower lobes. These trends are confirmed by the numerical simulations, with theoretical results being very close to experimental data. The final value for wear was measured, the maximum being found to be located at an angular coordinate of 180deg and reaching nearly 9μm. The present study demonstrates that, for the case studied, while the bearing behavior is clearly affected by wear, the bearing still remains useable and safe.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Coordinate system

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Figure 3

Experimental and theoretical curves for both new and worn bearing

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Figure 4

Pressure field on the loaded lobe in the bearing midplane

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Figure 5

Film thickness on the loaded lobe in the bearing midplane

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Figure 6

Temperature field on the loaded lobe in the bearing midplane

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