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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Hydroinertia Gas Bearing System to Achieve 470ms Tip Speed of 10mm-Diameter Impellers

[+] Author and Article Information
Shuji Tanaka1

Department of Nanomechanics,  Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579, Japanshuji@cc.mech.tohoku.ac.jp

Masayoshi Esashi

Department of Nanomechanics,  Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aza Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579, Japan

Kousuke Isomura

Research & Engineering Division, Engine Technology Department, Aero-Engine & Space Operations,  Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., 3-5-1 Mukodai-cho, Nishi-Tokyo, Tokyo 188-8555, Japan

Kousuke Hikichi, Yuki Endo, Shinichi Togo

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Tohoku-Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Chuo, Tagajo, Miyagi 985-0873, Japan

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 129(3), 655-659 (Jan 16, 2007) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2736707 History: Received February 23, 2006; Revised January 16, 2007

A microbearing tester driven by an air turbine of 10mm diameter has been developed, and successfully used to test hydroinertia gas bearings with a shaft of 4mm diameter. The effects of bearing gas pressure conditions and bearing length to diameter ratio (LD) on the maximum achievable rotation speed were investigated. The maximum rotation speed of 890,000rpm, which corresponds to the DN number (the product of a shaft diameter in millimeter and a rotation speed in rpm) of 3,560,000, was achieved. At 890,000rpm, the tip speed of the turbine reaches approximately 470ms. Using the bearing system developed, the turbo components of a 100W class gas turbine and an air pump for 1kW class fuel cells can be tested.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Distributions of static pressure and Mach number in the bearing clearance of the hydroinertia gas bearing

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Figure 2

Cross-sectional structure of the microbearing tester

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Figure 3

Microbearing tester

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Figure 4

Rotor of the microbearing tester

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Figure 5

Half-splitting type bearing sleeves made of ZrO2 ceramics

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Figure 6

Load capacity and gas flow rate of the hydroinertia gas journal (a) and thrust (b) bearings

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Figure 7

Amplitude of radial rotor oscillation from 500,000rpmto890,000rpm

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Figure 8

Time domain wave forms of the rotor oscillation in the radial and axial directions at 890,000rpm

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Figure 9

Gas supply methods for the journal bearing

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Figure 10

Effect of journal bearing gas pressure on the maximum achievable rotation speed

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Figure 11

Time domain wave forms of the radial rotor oscillation on different bearing gas pressure conditions

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Figure 12

Effect of thrust bearing gas pressure on the maximum achievable rotation speed

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Figure 13

Time domain wave forms of the radial rotor oscillation at the maximum achievable rotation speeds for L∕D=0.675 and 1

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