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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Ball Motion and Sliding Friction in a Four-Contact-Point Ball Bearing

[+] Author and Article Information
Alexandre Leblanc

LaMCos,  INSA Lyon, CNRS UMR5259, Villeurbanne F69621, Francealexandre.leblanc@insa-lyon.fr

Daniel Nelias

LaMCos,  INSA Lyon, CNRS UMR5259, Villeurbanne F69621, Francedaniel.nelias@insa-lyon.fr

Product of the shaft speed in rpm by the pitch diameter of the bearing in millimeters.

J. Tribol 129(4), 801-808 (Mar 26, 2007) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2768079 History: Received November 16, 2006; Revised March 26, 2007

An analysis of double arched ball bearing, which considers centrifugal forces and gyroscopic effects, is performed. Based on operating conditions of a five DOF inner ring and Coulomb friction model, the conventional bearing theory is extended from two to three or four-contact points. The commonly used control criterion of ball bearing by the inner or outer raceway is debatable and is known to fit with difficulty with experimental data. In addition, when more than two-contact points are involved, it becomes obsolete. The paper presents a mathematical model to describe the complex ball bearing internal kinematics under the effect of the external working conditions. Lubricant thickness is taken into account in geometrical equations and the nonlinear system of this quasistatic model is solved by a Newton-Raphson method. The model is first validated through comparisons with published data for conventional or single arched ball bearings. Results are also compared to those provided by the commercial software RBL4 . The analysis of a double arched ball bearing is finally performed and the complex motion of the ball highlighted.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Arched ball bearing axially loaded

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Figure 8

Forces acting on ball

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Figure 1

Arched ball bearing radially loaded

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Figure 3

Coordinate system, external applied loads, and corresponding rotations and translations

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Figure 4

Initial and final positions of curvature centers

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Figure 5

Inner raceway curvature centers in global system

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Figure 7

Left-inner-race contact

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Figure 9

Moments acting on ball

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Figure 10

Effect of speed on normal load-arched bearing A (go=0.254mm) for an axial load of 445daN

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Figure 11

Effect of speed on normal load-arched bearing A (go=0.254mm) for an axial load of 2220daN

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Figure 17

Distribution of power loss by friction at the raceway contacts between the 20 balls of bearing B versus the thrust load (ball No. 1 is located along the radial load direction)

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Figure 18

Maximum PV factor for each ball of bearing B versus the thrust load

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Figure 12

Mixed load-double arched bearing B (αsi=14.02deg and αso=21.61deg)

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Figure 13

Sliding lines for three balls of Fig. 1

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Figure 14

Mixed load-double arched bearing B (αsi=14.02deg and αso=21.61deg)

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Figure 15

Sliding lines for the first three balls of Fig. 1

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Figure 16

Reduction of outer-left raceway loads for arched bearing B

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