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TECHNICAL PAPERS

The Influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings—Part I: Theory

[+] Author and Article Information
Niels Heinrichson

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmarknhe@mek.dtu.dk

Ilmar Ferreira Santos

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmarkifs@mek.dtu.dk

Axel Fuerst

Hydrogenerator Technology Centre, Alstom(Switzerland) Ltd., CH-5242 Birr, Switzerlandaxel.fuerst@power.alstom.com

J. Tribol 129(4), 895-903 (Jun 19, 2007) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2768609 History: Received June 14, 2006; Revised June 19, 2007

This is Part I of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high-pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. In Part I a numerical model based on the Reynolds equation is developed extending the three-dimensional thermoelastohydrodynamic (TEHD) analysis of tilting-pad thrust bearings to include the effects of high-pressure injection and recesses in the bearing pads. The model is applied to the analysis of an existing bearing of large dimensions and the influence of the pocket is analyzed. In the analysis, the high-pressure oil injection used for hydrostatic jacking is turned off (i.e., only the effect of the pocket is studied). It is shown that a shallow pocket positively influences the performance of the bearing because it has characteristics similar to those of a Rayleigh-step bearing. In Part II of the paper (Heinrichson, N., Fuerst, A., and Santos, I. F., 2007, ASME J. Tribol., 129(4), pp. 904–912) measurements of pressure profiles and oil film thickness for a test-pad are compared to theoretical results. The analysis of Part II deals both with flow situations, where the high-pressure injection is turned off, as well as with situations where it is turned on for hydrostatic jacking.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The coordinate system used

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Figure 2

Selected details of the computational grid. The energy fluxes from the oil film into the pocket control volume.

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Figure 3

Flowchart for the program

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Figure 4

Instrumented pad of the Bieudron hydro power plant

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Figure 5

Dimensions of the ring support (in millimeters). The dotted line indicates the smoothing function used for the plate thickness. A 3mm babbitt layer coats the pad.

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Figure 6

Predicted contours of film thickness (top graph), pressure (middle graph), and pad surface temperature (bottom graph) for the studied thrust bearing pads. Left graphs concern the bearing with injection pockets. Right graphs show results for the plain bearing pad. Operating conditions: ω=44.9rad∕s, Fz=4.94MN.

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Figure 7

Pressure distribution at the 25%, 50%, and 75% radial positions for various pocket radii rp. The pocket radius is varied between zero and 115mm. The maximum pocket depth hp,max=2.27mm is kept constant.

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Figure 8

Minimum oil film thickness (a), maximum oil film thickness (b), and friction loss (c) are presented for various pocket radii rp. The pocket radius is varied between zero and 115mm. The maximum pocket depth hp,max=2.27mm is kept constant.

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Figure 9

Pressure distribution at the 25%, 50%, and 75% radial positions for various maximum pocket depths hp,max. The maximum pocket depth is varied between zero and 5mm. The pocket radius rp=65mm is kept constant.

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Figure 10

Minimum oil film thickness (a), maximum oil film thickness (b), and friction loss (c) are presented for various maximum pocket depths hp,max. The maximum pocket depth is varied between zero and 5mm. The pocket radius rp=65mm is kept constant. The thin horizontal lines in the graphs represent values obtained for a plain pad without a pocket.

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