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Research Papers: Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

Interaction of Asperities on Opposing Surfaces in Thin Film, Mixed Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

[+] Author and Article Information
Jian W. Choo

Group Research, PETRONAS, Lots 3288 and 3289, Off Jalan Ayer Itam, Kawasan Institusi Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000, Malaysiachoojianwen@petronas.com.my

Andrew V. Olver

Tribology Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdoma.v.olver@imperial.ac.uk

Hugh A. Spikes

Tribology Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdomh.spikes@imperial.ac.uk

Marie-Laure Dumont

 SKF Research and Development Centre, B.V., Kelvinbaan 16, Nieuwegein 3430 DT, The Netherlandsmarie-laure.dumont@skf.com

Eustathios Ioannides

 SKF Research and Development Centre, B.V., Kelvinbaan 16, Nieuwegein 3430 DT, The Netherlandsstathis.ioannides@skf.com

J. Tribol 130(2), 021505 (Apr 24, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2908904 History: Received September 25, 2006; Revised October 10, 2007; Published April 24, 2008

A novel experimental method has been developed to investigate how model asperities, on opposing surfaces in an elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contact, interact to influence the lubricant film distribution. This technique allows direct measurements of lubricant film thickness during asperity-asperity collision. A surface having a single transverse ridge asperity was rubbed against a second surface having three different roughness features, a transverse ridge, multiple transverse ridges, and an array of hemispherical bumps to study the resultant micro-EHD films. This work reveals how the film thickness is greatly reduced when the peaks of opposing asperities coincide, and how asperities can combine to cause a larger volume of lubricant to be entrapped at their leading edges. The new technique described shows considerable promise for the study of mixed lubrication.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic setup of spacer layer imaging method (SLIM)

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Figure 2

(a) Typical rough surface experiment with feature on one surface. (b) Roughness feature on opposing surfaces to study asperity interaction.

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Figure 3

Experimental setup. Glass ridges sputtered on the disk such that they lie across the rolling track and perpendicular to the entrainment direction (inset).

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Figure 4

(Top) Profiles of (i) a single transverse ridge, (ii) multiple transverse ridges, and (iii) an array of near-hemispherical bumps, sputtered onto steel balls. (Bottom) Profiles of the two glass ridges sputtered on the disk after coating with chromium and spacer layer.

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Figure 5

Interference images and film thickness profiles of an EHD contact caused by chromium features sputtered on the steel ball. (a) Ridge A, (b) MTR2, and (c) MRB2 (20N, 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1).

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Figure 6

Interference images and film thickness profiles of Glass Ridge A pressed against a smooth steel ball at the standard 20N test load. (a) Static, (b) 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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Figure 7

Interference images and film thickness profiles of Glass Ridge B pressed against a smooth steel ball at the standard 20N test load. (a) Static, (b) 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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Figure 8

Interference images and film thickness profiles of Glass Ridge A (disk) interacting with Ridge A (ball). 20N, 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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Figure 9

Interference images and film thickness profiles of Glass Ridge B (disk) interacting with Ridge A (ball). 20N, 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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Figure 11

Interference images and film thickness profiles of Glass Ridge B (disk) interacting with MTR2 (ball). 20N, 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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Figure 12

Interference images and film thickness profiles of (a) Glass Ridge A and (b) Glass Ridge B interacting with MRB2 (ball). 20N, 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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Figure 10

Interference images and film thickness profiles of Glass Ridge A (disk) interacting with MTR2 (ball). 20N, 28°C, pure rolling, 27mms−1.

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