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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Influence of Crystallographic Orientation on Energy Dissipation During Sliding

[+] Author and Article Information
Jeremy J. Dawkins

The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405

Richard W. Neu1

The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405rick.neu@gatech.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 130(4), 041604 (Aug 07, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2959114 History: Received February 08, 2008; Revised June 12, 2008; Published August 07, 2008

The aim of this study is to evaluate a methodology for modeling the influence of crystallographic grain orientation in sliding contacts. The simulations of translating interfering cylindrical asperities, using finite element analysis, were conducted using two different plasticity models for copper: a conventional isotropic, homogeneous J2 plasticity model and a continuum crystal plasticity model. Using crystal plasticity, the dependence of crystallographic orientation on plastic deformation and energy dissipation can be determined. The relative trends predicted using crystal plasticity are consistent with experiments that show friction depends on crystallographic orientation when plastic deformation is one of the primary energy dissipation mechanisms.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Influence of crystallographic orientation when sliding on the cubic face of single-crystal Cu (10)

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Figure 2

Translating cylinders model (2)

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Figure 3

Stress-strain response of annealed polycrystalline Cu showing crystal plasticity model simulations

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Figure 4

Representative volume element simulation containing 64 randomly oriented grains used to validate crystal plasticity model showing von Mises stresses when the macroscopic uniaxial stress is 330MPa

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Figure 5

Effective plastic strain after translating cylinders with ω*=20 for (a) isotropic over isotropic, (b) (001)[100] over (001)[100], and (c) (001)[110] over (001)[110]

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Figure 6

Von Mises stress at maximum vertical interference (x∕R=0) with ω*=20 for (a) isotropic over isotropic, (b) (001)[100] over (001)[100], and (c) (001)[110] over (001)[110]

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Figure 7

Maximum vertical surface displacement during translation

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Figure 8

Horizontal reaction force during translation

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Figure 9

Normal force during translation

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Figure 10

Effective plastic strain after translating cylinders with ω*=20 and orientations of (001)[100] over (001)[110]

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Figure 11

Horizontal reaction force during translation comparing different combinations of orientations

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