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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Paper-Based Friction Material: Study on Friction Stability as a Function of Operating Variables

[+] Author and Article Information
Jie Fei, Le-Hua Qi, Ye-Wei Fu, Xin-Tao Li

Carbon/Carbon Composites Research Center, National Key Laboratory of Thermostructure Composite Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, P.R.C.

He-Jun Li

Carbon/Carbon Composites Research Center, National Key Laboratory of Thermostructure Composite Materials, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072, P.R.C.lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn

J. Tribol 130(4), 041605 (Aug 12, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2966388 History: Received January 13, 2008; Revised June 29, 2008; Published August 12, 2008

Carbon-fiber-reinforced paper-based friction material (CFRPF), as a new type of wet friction material for automatic transmission, was prepared by a paper-making process. The frictional response of CFRPF is highly complex under a set of dynamically variable operating conditions. To better understand the effect of operating factors (braking pressure, rotating speed, oil temperature, and oil flow rate) on friction stability of the material, tests were carried out using a single ingredient experiment and the Taguchi method. Experimental results show that the braking stability and the dynamic friction coefficient (μd) decrease as braking pressure, rotating speed, oil temperature, and oil flow rate increase. The influence of braking pressure on μd is largest among the four operating factors. μd declines gradually during the first 3000 repeated braking cycles and changes very little subsequently due to the surface topography change in friction material.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the test sample

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Figure 2

Schematic of QM1000-II wet friction performance tester: (1) flywheel, (2) speed recorder, (3) clutch, (4) guide for friction plate, (5) sample, (6) separator plate, (7) hydraulic cylinder, (8) flowmeter, (9) oil tank, (10) ac motor, (11) pyrogenation installation, (12) thermometer, (13) computer, (14) controller, (15) ac motor, and (16) frequency drum

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Figure 3

SEM micrograph of the sample

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Figure 4

The typical friction torque curves of the sample under braking pressures of 0.3 MPa (a), 0.5 MPa (b), and 1.0 MPa (c)

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Figure 5

Relationship between μd and braking pressure

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Figure 6

The typical friction torque curves of the sample under rotating speeds of 2000 rpm (a), 3000 rpm (b), and 4000 rpm (c)

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Figure 7

Relationship between μd and rotating speed

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Figure 8

The changing temperature of the separator plate in the braking process under different rotating speeds

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Figure 9

The typical friction torque curves of the sample with oil temperatures of 47°C (a), 70°C (b), and 109°C (c)

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Figure 10

Relationship between μd and oil temperature

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Figure 11

The typical friction torque curves of the sample with the oil flow rates of 8 ml/min (a), 95 ml/min (b), and 251 ml/min (c)

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Figure 12

Relationship between μd and oil flow rate

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Figure 13

Plots of μd with the operating factors: braking pressure (a), rotating speed (b), oil temperature (c), and oil flow rate (d)

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Figure 14

Friction torque curves with the repeated braking cycles of 100 (a), 1300 (b), 3400 (c), and 5000 (d)

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Figure 15

The μd throughout the repeated braking cycles

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Figure 16

Optical microscope micrographs of the sample: (a) new surface and (b) worn surface

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