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Research Papers: Lubricants

A Pin-on-Disk Experimental Study on a Green Particulate-Fluid Lubricant

[+] Author and Article Information
M. A. Kabir

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890; School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, 323 Benedum Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260

C. Fred Higgs1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890higgs@andrew.cmu.edu

Michael R. Lovell

School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, 323 Benedum Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15260mlovell@engr.pitt.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 130(4), 041801 (Aug 05, 2008) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2908913 History: Received May 20, 2007; Revised January 10, 2008; Published August 05, 2008

The present investigation analyzes a green, petroleum-free lubricant that is produced by mixing two environmentally benign components—canola oil and boric acid powder. To study the influence of boric acid particle size and solid volume fraction on the proposed lubricant performance, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted with spherical copper pins (radius 6.5mm) and aluminum disks (Ra=1.35μm). Friction coefficient measurements were taken at more than 20 distinct operating conditions while varying the lubrication condition (unlubricated, boric acid, canola oil, boric acid/canola oil mixture), boric acid volume fraction, and boric acid particle size. Based on the experiments, it was determined that a solid volume fraction of 7% with 350700μm particles was the optimum green particulate lubricant candidate for minimizing the friction at the conditions tested. This work also uncovered an inverse relationship between the friction coefficient and boric acid particle size (in canola oil at 7% solid fraction). Micrographs of the pin and disk wear track were analyzed to study this frictional behavior of the interface materials. Additionally, rheological tests were conducted to measure the viscosity of the canola oil and boric acid powder mixture as a function of particle size, and it was found that the viscosity increased with particle size over the size range tested. Finally, the results indicated that the boric acid-canola oil lubricant mixture demonstrated excellent potential for use as lubricants in industrial applications such as sheet metal forming.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Boric acid-canola oil lubricant PAML interface

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Figure 2

SEM image of boric acid powder/crystals

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Figure 3

COF with sliding distance

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Figure 4

COF versus solid volume fraction

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Figure 5

COF with sliding distance

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Figure 6

Steady-state COF with mean particle size

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Figure 7

Particles on disk wear track before and after test: 0–100μm

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Figure 8

Particles on disk wear track before and after test: 150–180μm

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Figure 9

Particles on disk wear track before and after test: 350–700μm

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Figure 10

Viscosity versus particle size Pd

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