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Research Papers: Magnetic Storage

Loading Velocity Effect in the Load/Unload Systems With Multiple Flying Height States

[+] Author and Article Information
Polina V. Khan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan, Gyongbuk 712-749, Koreapolinakhan@gmail.com

Pyung Hwang1

School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan, Gyongbuk 712-749, Koreaphwang@ynu.ac.kr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 131(1), 011901 (Nov 26, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2991165 History: Received April 28, 2007; Revised August 16, 2008; Published November 26, 2008

The effect of the loading velocity on the loading process in the computer hard disk drive air slider system with multiple flying height states was studied numerically. The results of the static analysis were compared with the dynamic loading trajectories. The air lubrication problem was solved using the finite-element method. The static flying height states for variable suspension forces were considered as solution branches and were found by using a numerical continuation method. The dynamic loading trajectory was obtained iteratively by applying the Newmark method for the slider position and an implicit scheme for the air film pressure. Close agreement was found between the solution branches and the trajectories of dynamic loading with a velocity of 5 mm/s. At the higher velocities, the unstable negative pitching motion and the slider-disk contact at the slider’s leading edge were detected. Increasing the x-offset of the suspension point made it possible to complete loading with 10 mm/s. At the same time, increasing the x-offset led to the slider-disk contact at the slider’s trailing edge in the beginning of loading with a velocity exceeding 25 mm/s.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The frame of reference and the components of the slider position vector

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Figure 2

Air-bearing surface: (1) 2500 nm recess level, (2) 300 nm recess level, and (3) zero recess level

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Figure 3

Flying height–air-bearing force projection of the solution branches for xs of 0.1 mm and 0.15 mm. The solid lines denote stable solution branches and the dashed lines denote unstable solution branches.

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Figure 5

The scheme of a quasistatic loading process

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Figure 4

Pitching angle–air-bearing force projection of the solution branches for xs of 0.1 mm and 0.15 mm. The solid lines denote stable solution branches and the dashed lines denote unstable solution branches.

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Figure 11

Pitching angle projection of the loading trajectory for x-offset of 0.15 mm

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Figure 6

Flying height projection of the loading trajectory for x-offset of 0.1 mm

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Figure 7

Pitching angle projection of the loading trajectory for x-offset of 0.1 mm

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Figure 8

Comparison of the static solution branches (gray, thick) and the dynamic loading trajectories (black, thin) in the minimal spacing–air-bearing force plane for xs=0.1 mm

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Figure 9

Comparison of the static solution branches (gray, thick) and the dynamic loading trajectories (black, thin) in the pitching angle–air-bearing force plane for xs=0.1 mm

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Figure 10

Flying height projection of the loading trajectory for x-offset of 0.15 mm

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Figure 12

Comparison of the static solution branches (gray, thick) and the dynamic loading trajectories (black, thin) in the minimal spacing–air-bearing force plane for xs=0.15 mm

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Figure 13

Comparison of the static solution branches (gray, thick) and the dynamic loading trajectories (black, thin) in the pitching angle–air-bearing force plane for xs=0.15 mm

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