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Research Papers: Micro-Nano Tribology

Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method for the Simulation of Rarefied Gas Flow in Discrete Track Recording Head/Disk Interfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Maik Duwensee

 University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093maik.work@gmail.com

Frank E. Talke

 University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093

Shoji Suzuki

 Western Digital, 1710 Automation Parkway, San Jose, CA 95131shoji.suzuki@wdc.com

Judy Lin, David Wachenschwanz

 Western Digital, 1710 Automation Parkway, San Jose, CA 95131

J. Tribol 131(1), 012001 (Nov 26, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2991166 History: Received June 03, 2007; Revised July 11, 2008; Published November 26, 2008

The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is used to study rarefied gas flow between an inclined plane slider bearing and a nanochannel representing one groove in discrete track recording head/disk interfaces. The forces acting on the slider are determined as a function of slider pitch angle, disk velocity, groove pitch, width, and groove depth. It is found that the influence of manufacturing tolerances on slider forces is smaller for deep and wide grooves than for the case of shallow and narrow grooves.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the discrete track recording disk

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Figure 2

Schematic of the bit patterned recording disk

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Figure 3

Schematic of the inclined slider bearing over a single groove and land region

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Figure 4

Flowchart of direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm

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Figure 5

Simulation domain

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Figure 6

Applied boundary condition: ((a) and (b)) inflow/outflow and (c) periodic boundary condition

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Figure 7

Illustration of the periodic boundary condition

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Figure 8

Air-bearing force acting on the slider versus groove depth for different pitch angles

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Figure 9

Air-bearing force acting on the slider for different pitch angles normalized by track pitch p

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Figure 10

Air-bearing force acting on the slider for different disk velocities normalized by track pitch p

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Figure 11

Force acting on the slider versus groove depth and constant groove width: (a) friction force and (b) air bearing force

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Figure 12

Force acting on the slider versus groove width and constant groove depth: (a) friction force and (b) air bearing force

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Figure 13

Schematic of the nanochannel with w/p constant

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Figure 14

Air-bearing force/track pitch versus groove depth d(w/p=0.5)

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Figure 15

Air-bearing force/track pitch versus groove width w(w/p=0.5)

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