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Research Papers: Hydrodynamic Lubrication

Steady State Performance Characteristics of Single Pad Externally Adjustable Fluid Film Bearing in the Laminar and Turbulent Regimes

[+] Author and Article Information
B. S. Shenoy

Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal, Karnataka 576104, Indiasatishshenoyb@yahoo.com

R. Pai

Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal, Karnataka 576104, Indiarbpai@yahoo.com

J. Tribol 131(2), 021701 (Mar 04, 2009) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3070580 History: Received April 24, 2008; Revised October 18, 2008; Published March 04, 2009

In an externally adjustable fluid film bearing, the hydrodynamic conditions can be changed as required in a controlled manner. The principal feature of the bearing is the facility to adjust its radial clearance and circumferential film thickness gradient. Unlike a tilting pad bearing, this bearing can have radial adjustments. The tilt adjustments are obtained by providing flexibility to the pad at one corner. This paper deals with the effect of turbulence on the steady state performance characteristics of a centrally loaded 120 deg single pad externally adjustable fluid film bearing. The bearing has an aspect ratio of 1 and operates over a wide range of eccentricity ratios with different radial and tilt adjustments. The Reynolds equation is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The linearized turbulence model of Ng and Pan (1965, “A Linearized Turbulent Lubrication Theory  ,” ASME J. Basic Eng., 87, pp. 675–688) as well as the simplified adiabatic model of Pinkus and Bupara (1979, “Adiabatic Solutions for Finite Journal Bearings  ,” ASME J. Lubr. Technol., 101, pp. 492–496) are incorporated in the solution scheme. The static performance characteristics calculated are presented in terms of load carrying capacity, attitude angle, friction variable, and Sommerfeld number. A comparative study with the combination of adjustments predicts that the static performance of the bearing is superior with negative radial and tilt adjustments.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of single pad externally adjustable fluid film bearing

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Figure 2

Schematic diagram of the adjustable pad with various configurations and angle definitions

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Figure 3

Comparison of attitude angle with illustrations in Szeri (15)

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Figure 4

Comparison of friction variable with illustrations in Szeri (15)

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Figure 5

Distribution of p¯ in the bearing midplane with ε=0.4

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Figure 6

Load capacity versus eccentricity ratio with various values of Tadj and Radj for E=0.0

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Figure 7

Load capacity versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Re and E

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Figure 8

Attitude angle versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Tadj and Radj for E=0.0

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Figure 9

Attitude angle versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Re and E

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Figure 10

Oil flow versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Tadj and Radj for E=0.0

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Figure 11

Oil flow versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Re and E

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Figure 12

Friction variable versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Tadj and Radj for E=0.0

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Figure 13

Friction variable versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Re and E

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Figure 14

Sommerfeld number versus eccentricity ratio for various values of Tadj and Radj for E=0.0

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