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Research Papers: Other (Seals, Manufacturing)

Oil Churning Power Losses of a Gear Pair: Experiments and Model Validation

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Seetharaman, M. D. Moorhead, T. T. Petry-Johnson

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210

A. Kahraman1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210kahraman.1@osu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 131(2), 022202 (Feb 26, 2009) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3085942 History: Received June 13, 2008; Revised January 27, 2009; Published February 26, 2009

This paper presents the results of an experimental study on load-independent (spin) power losses of spur gear pairs operating under dip-lubricated conditions. The experiments were performed over a wide range of operating speed, temperature, oil levels, and key gear design parameters to quantify their influence on spin power losses. The measurements indicate that the static oil level, rotational speed, and face width of gears have a significant impact on spin power losses compared with other parameters such as oil temperature, gear module, and the direction of gear rotation. A physics-based gear pair spin power loss formulation that was proposed in a companion paper (Seetharaman and Kahraman, 2009, “Load-Independent Spin Power Losses of a Spur Gear Pair: Model Formulation,” ASME J. Tribol., 131, p. 022201) was used to simulate these experiments. Direct comparisons between the model predictions and measurements are provided at the end to demonstrate that the model is capable of predicting the measured spin power loss values as well as the measured parameter sensitivities reasonably well.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Particle spin , Gears
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Figures

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Figure 1

Definition of oil churning parameters for a partially immersed gear pair

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Figure 2

(a) A view and (b) the layout of the gear efficiency test machine

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Figure 3

One of the test gear boxes shown in dip-lubrication arrangement

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Figure 4

Two examples of test gears: (a) 23-tooth gear with m̃=3.95 mm and b=19.5 mm and (b) 40-tooth gear with m̃=2.32 mm and b=19.5 mm

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Figure 5

Illustration of oil level parameters and gear rotation directions: (a) up-in-mesh and (b) down-in mesh

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Figure 6

Measured PsT for a gear pair with m̃=2.32 mm and b=19.5 mm, rotating up-in-mesh direction in the oil bath with (a) h¯=0.05, (b) h¯=0.5, (c) h¯=1.0, and (d) h¯=1.5

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Figure 7

Influence of rotational direction on measured PsT for a gear pair with m̃=2.32 mm and b=19.5 mm at h¯=1.0

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Figure 8

Influence of (a) face width b and (b) module m̃ on measured PsT for gears rotating up-in-mesh with h¯=1.0

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Figure 9

Comparison of predicted to the measured PsT for a gear pair at (a) 30°C, (b) 50°C, (c) 70°C, and (d) 90°C; m̃=2.32 mm, b=19.5 mm, and h¯=1.0 (up-in-mesh)

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Figure 10

Comparison of predicted to the measured PsT for a gear pair at (a) h¯=0.05, (b) h¯=0.5, (c) h¯=1.0, and (d) h¯=1.5; oil at 80°C (up-in-mesh), m̃=2.32 mm, and b=19.5 mm

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Figure 11

Comparison of predicted to the measured PsT for a gear pair having m̃=2.32 mm and face width values of (a) b=14.7 mm, (b) b=19.5 mm, and (c) b=26.7 mm; oil at 80°C (up-in-mesh) and h¯=1.0

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Figure 12

Comparison of predicted to the measured PsT for a gear pair of face width b=19.5 mm and modules of (a) m̃=2.32 mm and (b) m̃=3.95 mm; oil at 80°C (up-in-mesh), and h¯=1.0

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