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Research Papers: Mixed and Boundary Lubrication

Synthesis and Lubrication Characteristics of Aryloxycyclophosphazenes Substituted With Imidazolium

[+] Author and Article Information
Jinlong Li

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China; Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China

Feng Zhou, Dapeng Feng, Yanqiu Xia, Weimin Liu

State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China

J. Tribol 131(3), 032101 (May 22, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3118786 History: Received August 31, 2008; Revised February 15, 2009; Published May 22, 2009

A series of new aryloxycyclophosphazene derivatives substituted with imidazolium ionic liquids was synthesized. Their tribological properties were investigated on an Optimol SRV IV oscillating friction and wear tester in ambient condition. An electric field was imposed between the ball and disk to monitor the tribochemical reaction by means of “contact resistance.” These ionic liquids substituted cyclophosphazene derivatives present lower friction coefficient and wear volume loss than tetrakis-(3-trifluoromethylphenoxy)-bis(4-fluorophenoxy)cyclotriphosphazene. The polarity of ionic liquids is believed to provide strong adsorption to contact surfaces and can form a boundary lubricating film leading to friction and wear reductions. Introducing the ionic liquids to cyclophosphazene may be a new method to improve the tribological properties of cyclophosphazene derivatives.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figure ch1

Synthesis of cyclophosphazene derivatives

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Figure 1

Schematic illustration of Optimol SRV IV oscillating friction and wear tester

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Figure 2

TGA curves of cyclophosphazene derivatives

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Figure 3

Variations in real-time friction coefficient with time under increasing load

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Figure 4

Wear volume loss of lower steel disks (a) and diameter of wear scars of the ball (b) lubricated with various lubricants (frequency of 25 Hz and test duration of 30 min at 25°C)

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Figure 5

Variations in (a) real-time friction coefficient and (b) contact resistance (Ω) with time at room temperature and 300 N: (A) X-1P and (B) compound I

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Figure 6

SEM morphologies of the worn surfaces of disk lubricated by (a) X-1P, (b) compound I, (c) compound II, and (d) compound III at room temperature and 300 N

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Figure 7

XPS spectra of the neat compound I (a) and wear scars on disks lubricated by (b) compound I and (c) X-1P

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