0
Technical Briefs

A Study of Airborne Wear Particles Generated From a Sliding Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Ulf Olofsson

Department of Machine Design, Royal Institute of Technology, SE 100 44 Stockholm, Swedenulf.olofsson@itm.kth.se

Lars Olander

Department of Building Services Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE 100 44 Stockholm, Swedenlars.olander@byv.kth.se

Anders Jansson

Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, SE 106 91 Stockholm, Swedenanders.jansson@itm.su.se

J. Tribol 131(4), 044503 (Sep 23, 2009) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3176990 History: Received August 31, 2008; Revised June 03, 2009; Published September 23, 2009

Recently, much attention has been paid to the influence of airborne particles in the atmosphere on human health. Sliding contacts are a significant source of airborne particles in urban environments. In this study airborne particles generated from a sliding steel-on-steel combination are studied using a pin-on-disk tribometer equipped with airborne-particle counting instrumentation. The instrumentation measured particles in size intervals from 0.01μm to 32μm. The result shows three particle size regimes with distinct number peaks: ultrafine particles with a size distribution peak around 0.08μm, fine particles with a peak around 0.35μm, and coarse particles with a peak around 2 or 4μm. Both the particle generation rate and the wear rate increase with increasing sliding velocity and contact pressure.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the test equipment. (A) Room air; (B) fan; (C) flow rate measurement; (D) filter; (E) flexible tube; (F) inlet for clean air, measurement point; (G) closed box (chamber); (H) pin-on-disk machine; (N) air inside box, well mixed; (J) air outlet, measurement points; (L) dead weight; (M) rotating disk sample; and (I) pin sample.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Wear rate and particle generation rate versus contact pressure. Error bar plus one standard deviation.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Wear rate and particle generation rate versus sliding velocity. Error bar plus one standard deviation.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Particle number (N) and volume (V) distributions versus particle diameter (D) for test E. Top figure results from the Grimm Instrument and bottom figure results from the SMPS.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Particle number (N) and volume (V) distributions versus particle diameter (D) for test G. Top figure results from the Grimm Instrument and bottom figure results from the SMPS.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In