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Research Papers: Applications

Vibration and Acoustic Emission of Linear-Guideway Type Recirculating Ball Bearings With a Millimeter-Sized Artificial Defect in the Carriage

[+] Author and Article Information
Hiroyuki Ohta

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japanohta@mech.nagaokaut.ac.jp

Kazuya Matsuura

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188, Japan

Soichiro Kato

LG Technology Department, NSK Precision Co. Ltd., 78 Toriba, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8527, Japan

Yutaka Igarashi

Research Department, NSK Precision Co. Ltd., 78 Toriba, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8527, Japan

In this paper, AE is defined as “the transient elastic waves generated by the interaction of two surfaces in relative motion (15).”

J. Tribol 132(1), 011101 (Nov 09, 2009) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000271 History: Received November 23, 2008; Revised August 31, 2009; Published November 09, 2009; Online November 09, 2009

This paper deals with vibrations and acoustic emissions (AEs) of linear-guideway type recirculating ball bearings with a millimeter-sized artificial defect in the carriage. The vibration and AE of one normal bearing without a defect (Type N), and six defective bearings (Types D1–D6) were measured using a linear velocity of 1 m/s. The defects in the bearings range from 1.87 mm to 6.77 mm in length, 2.45 mm to 3.80 mm in width, and 23.3μm to 68.0μm in depth. The experimental results show that the pulse amplitudes of the vibrations and AE (both the peak-to-peak and RMS values) of the defective bearings have a tendency to be greater than those of the normal bearing. Both the measured vibration and AE components over 30 kHz increased in the carriages with defects. To explain these increases in the defective bearings, a collision model with balls and one defect in the carriage is presented. That collision model shows that the increases in both the vibrations and AE of the defective bearings are caused by increases in the defect angle. A reasonable correlation exists between the presented collision model and the measured vibrations or AE of the defective bearings.

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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Location of carriage defect

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Figure 3

Photographs of carriage defects

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Figure 4

Profiles of defects in the longitudinal direction of carriage raceways

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Figure 5

Experimental apparatus

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Figure 6

Time waveforms of test bearings

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Figure 7

Measured P-P values of vibrations and AE versus defect length

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Figure 8

Measured RMS values of vibrations and AE versus defect length

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Figure 9

Frequency spectra

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Figure 10

Collision model of balls and defect

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Figure 11

Coordinates of defect and defect angle θd

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Figure 12

Effects of defect angles on measured RMS values

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