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Research Papers: Magnetic Storage

Numerical Investigation of Bouncing Vibrations of an Air Bearing Slider in Near or Partial Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
Du Chen

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Computer Mechanics Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720duchen@cml.me.berkeley.edu

David B. Bogy

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Computer Mechanics Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720dbogy@cml.me.berkeley.edu

J. Tribol 132(1), 011901 (Dec 10, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000514 History: Received September 03, 2008; Revised October 01, 2009; Published December 10, 2009; Online December 10, 2009

Near or partial contact sliders are designed for the areal recording density of 1Tbit/in.2 or even higher in hard disk drives. The bouncing vibration of an air bearing-slider in near or partial contact with the disk is numerically analyzed using three different nonlinear slider dynamics models. In these three models, the air bearing with contact is modeled either by using the generalized Reynolds equation modified with the Fukui–Kaneko slip correction and a recent second order slip correction for the contact situation, or using nonlinear springs to represent the air bearing. The contact and adhesion between the slider and the disk are considered either through an elastic contact model and an improved intermolecular adhesion model, respectively, or using an Ono–Yamane multi-asperity contact and adhesion model (2007, “Improved Analysis of Unstable Bouncing Vibration and Stabilizing Design of Flying Head Slider in Near-Contact Region  ,” ASME J. Tribol., 129, pp. 65–74.). The contact friction is calculated by using Coulomb’s law and the contact force. The simulation results from all of these models show that the slider’s bouncing vibration occurs as a forced vibration caused by the moving microwaviness and roughness on the disk surface. The disk surface microwaviness and roughness, which move into the head disk interface as the disk rotates, excite the bouncing vibration of the partial contact slider. The contact, adhesion, and friction between the slider and the disk do not directly cause a bouncing vibration in the absence of disk microwaviness or roughness.

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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Simplified characteristic model of real contact force, adhesion force and contact force as functions of separation (1)

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Figure 4

Air bearing surface design of the CML slider used in the CML 2DOF slider dynamic simulation

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Figure 5

Time history of the slider dynamics with different maximum meniscus forces fm

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Figure 6

Time history of the slider dynamics with different take-off FHs de

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Figure 1

Air bearing surface design of a microtrailing pad slider

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Figure 2

Time histories of the minimum spacing, pitch, roll, and power spectra of the minimum spacing of the three cases: (a) case I (the microtrailing pad slider on the ideally flat disk surface); (b) case II (the microtrailing pad slider on a rough disk surface with moving roughness within the HDI); and (c) case III (the microtrailing pad slider on a rough disk surface with stationary roughness within the HDI)

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Figure 14

Time history of the 2DOF slider model with the parameter values shown in Table 2, except that ζf=ζr=0.002: (a) d1=0.3 nm; (b) d1=ds

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Figure 7

Time history of the slider dynamics with the different friction coefficients μ

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Figure 8

Time history of the slider dynamics with different initial FHs

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Figure 9

2DOF slider model of Ono and Yamane (1)

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Figure 10

Time history of the 2DOF slider model with the parameter values shown in Table 2: (a) d1=0.3 nm; (b) d1=ds

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Figure 11

Time history of the 2DOF slider model with the parameter values shown in Table 2, except that μ=2.0: (a) d1=0.3 nm; (b) d1=ds

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Figure 12

Time history of the 2DOF slider model with the parameter values shown in Table 2, except that fm=50 mN: (a) d1=0.3 nm; (b) d1=ds

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Figure 13

Time history of the 2DOF slider model with the parameter values shown in Table 2, except that de=8 nm: (a) d1=0.3 nm; (b) d1=ds

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