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Research Papers: Contact Mechanics

Transient Thermal Effects and Heat Partition in Sliding Contacts

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Bosman

Department of Engineering Technology, Laboratory for Surface Technology and Tribology, University of Twente, P.O Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlandsr.bosman@utwente.nl

M. B. de Rooij

Department of Engineering Technology, Laboratory for Surface Technology and Tribology, University of Twente, P.O Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlandsm.b.derooij@utwente.nl

J. Tribol 132(2), 021401 (Mar 11, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000693 History: Received August 05, 2008; Revised October 30, 2009; Published March 11, 2010; Online March 11, 2010

In tribological applications, calculating the contact temperature between contacting surfaces makes it possible to estimate lubricant failure and effectiveness, material failure, and other phenomena. The contact temperature can be divided into two scales: the macroscopic and the microscopic scales. In this article, a semi-analytical transient temperature model is presented, which can be used at both scales. The general theory is presented here and used to calculate the contact temperatures of single micro- and macrocontacts. For the steady state situation, the results obtained are in good agreement with those found in literature. Further, it is shown that the simplification of modeling a microcontact as an equivalent square uniform heat source to simplify the calculation of the maximum temperature is justified in the fully plastic regime. The partition is calculated by setting a continuity condition on the temperature field over the contact. From the results, it can be concluded that at low sliding velocities the steady state assumption, which is often used for microcontacts, is correct. However, at higher sliding velocities, the microcontact is not in the steady state and transient calculation methods are advised.

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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Maximum contact temperature between a zirconia ball and a steel plate with contact conditions as in. The dotted line is the temperature profile if heat is allowed to flow into the zirconia ball; the continuous line is without taking into account the heat flow into the zirconia ball.

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Figure 4

(a) and (b) Temperature difference of the zirconia ball and steel plate; (c) temperature of the zirconia ball; (d) temperature of the steel plate; (e) partition factor of the ball; and (f) partition factor of the steel plate

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Figure 5

(a) Dimensionless temperature profiles of body 2 (Θmax is the maximum temperature of the centerline profile at the given velocity); (b) total partition factor of body 2 (total amount of the generated heat flowing into body 2); and (c) maximum temperature rise of body 2 divided by Θ∗

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Figure 6

(a) Dimensionless temperature profiles of body 2 (Θmax is the maximum temperature of the centerline profile at the given velocity); (b) total partition factor of body 2 (total amount of the generated heat flowing into body 2); and (c) maximum temperature rise of body 2 divided by Θ∗

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Figure 7

(a) and (b) Temperature difference of bodies 1 and 2; (c) temperature of body 1; (d) temperature of body 2; (e) partition factor of body 1; and (f) partition factor of body 2. Conditions (see Table 1) and Θbulk of the steel plate is 100°C higher than Θbulk of the zirconia ball.

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Figure 8

Contact temperature as a function of the Fourier number for a microcontact with a contact radius of 4×10−6 m, normal load of 0.2 N, and a coefficient of friction of 0.3 at a steel surface. The thick black line is the time at which contact is lost. Temperature is normalized to the maximum temperature of the cycle (t=3tc).

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Figure 9

Temperature profile along the centerline (y∗=0) of bodies (a) 1 and (b) 2; partition factor of bodies (c) 1 and (d) 2; sliding direction from left to right with Pe≈0.8

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Figure 2

Θmodel is the maximum temperature calculated using the model presented in this paper and ΘBos is the temperature calculated using the theory presented in Ref. 6

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Figure 1

Coordinate system: local coordinate systems (a) of the moving heat source and (b) of a surface element (19)

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Figure 10

Centerline temperature fields divided by the maximum temperature of the reference case (Θ0) as a function of x-location on the center axis of the heat source: (a) elastic case and (b) plastic case; sliding direction from left to right with Pe≈(0.7–1.4) and Γ≈(2–4)

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