0
Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Wear Mode Comparison of High-Performance Inconel Alloys

[+] Author and Article Information
Grant R. Fox

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843

Hong Liang1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843hliang@tamu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 132(2), 021603 (Apr 26, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001170 History: Received May 07, 2009; Revised January 26, 2010; Published April 26, 2010; Online April 26, 2010

Inconel alloys have been used as engineering materials in high temperature and high stress applications due to their excellent mechanical properties. Tribological performances of these alloys, however, have not been conducted extensively. This is because in tribological applications, these materials have not often been utilized in friction and wear-related applications, resulting in a deficiency in the characterization of their tribomechanical properties. In the present research, we investigate the mechanisms of tribological performance of two different Inconel alloys in terms of contact pressures and sliding speeds. We studied their frictional behavior. The wear data were plotted against the pressure×velocity (PV parameter) in order to investigate the changes of surface properties and wear behaviors of the same under the influence of mechanical energy input. It was interesting to find that the wear mechanisms were influenced by the process of tribotesting. There are three competing wear mechanisms found, abrasion, adhesion, and oxidation. Each of those dominates the tribological performance under different conditions.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Wear , Alloys , Friction
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Friction coefficient as a function of time of Inconel alloy HX and 625

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

SEM images of wear track of both Inconel alloys

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Specific wear rate versus input mechanical energy in the HX case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Optical microscope image of Inconel alloy HX wear track in regime (1): (a) 100× and (b) 500×

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Imicrographs of wear track of Inconel alloy HX: (a) 500×; (b) optical microscopic image of aggregated particles, 500×; (c) SEM image of aggregated particles in the similar areas of (b), 1000×; (d) close up of (c), 4000×

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Optical microscope image of multiple wear morphologies in Inconel alloy HX wear track: (a) 100×; (b) 500×

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Specific wear rate versus input mechanical energy in the 625 case

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Optical microscope image of wear track of 626: (a) 100×; (b) 500×

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Optical microscope image of wear track of 626 in the high wear region, 100×

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Optical microscope image of wear track of 626 in the high wear and high input energy region, 100×

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In