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Research Papers: Micro-Nano Tribology

A Scale Dependent Simulation of Liquid Lubricated Textured Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Robert L. Jackson

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, 270 Ross Hall, Auburn, AL 36849robert.jackson@eng.auburn.edu

J. Tribol 132(2), 022001 (Apr 06, 2010) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001105 History: Received July 30, 2009; Revised January 25, 2010; Published April 06, 2010; Online April 06, 2010

Over the past few years, the importance of nanoscale technology in industries, such as data storage, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs), and conventional sliding and rolling element bearings, has increased significantly. This is due to increased performance criteria and emerging technologies at smaller scales. One way to increase tribological performance of such applications is through nanoscale surface texturing. These textures will allow for precise control of the performance of lubricated surfaces with very thin films. This work examines how the behavior of the lubricant changes as the geometry of the texture is decreased toward the nanoscale. This work uses existing scale dependent lubrication theories to model the hydrodynamic lubrication of textured surfaces in attempt to predict how nanoscale textures will perform. The theoretical results show that the scale effects of a lubricant between textured surfaces can decrease the load carrying capacity while also decreasing the friction force. Overall, the friction force decreases more than the load carrying capacity and so the effective friction coefficient is decreased. It should be noted that relative to larger scale textured surfaces, the load support can also decrease with the decreasing scale of the texture.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 5

The effect of scale and porosity on the friction when the shear thinning and a porous boundary layer are both considered

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Figure 6

The effect of scale and porosity on the load carrying capacity when the shear thinning, fluid rupture, and a porous boundary layer are all considered

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Figure 7

The effect of scale and porosity on the friction when the shear thinning, fluid rupture, and a porous boundary layer are all considered

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Figure 8

Using the MD derived model by Martini (30-32), the effect of scale on the load when the shear thinning and viscosity oscillation are considered

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Figure 10

Using the MD derived model by Martini (30-32), the effect of scale on the friction coefficient when the shear thinning and viscosity oscillation are considered

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Figure 1

Effective viscosity based on molecular dynamics model (Eq. 2)

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Figure 2

Schematic of dimpled surfaces

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Figure 3

The effect of film thickness and porosity on load, when shear thinning and rupture are neglected

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Figure 4

The effect of scale and porosity on the load carrying capacity when the shear thinning and a porous boundary layer are both considered

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Using the MD derived model by Martini (30-32), the effect of scale on the friction force when the shear thinning and viscosity oscillation are considered

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