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Research Papers: Friction & Wear

Thermodynamic Model of the Metallic Friction Process

[+] Author and Article Information
Maria Maciąg

 Technical University of Radom, ul. Malczewskiego 29, Radom 26-600, Polandmaria-maciag@wp.pl

J. Tribol 132(3), 031603 (Jun 24, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001895 History: Received May 08, 2009; Revised May 23, 2010; Published June 24, 2010; Online June 24, 2010

An energy model of stabilized friction and wear is presented. Heating of a definite mass of surface material to the flash point, in consideration of the mass’s specific heat and wear, is assumed to provide the basis for thermal processes. An energy balance is presented in the form of a first law of thermodynamics formula for open systems. Two new magnitudes, referred to as complex systemic constants C and D, are developed and their physical meaning is interpreted. These complex systemic constants are subsequently employed to describe the tribological system. Among other magnitudes in the model, density of thermal dissipation and enthalpy flux, power density of mechanical dissipation, wear severity, and specific work of wear are described. Friction and wear testing results [Ciecieląg, 1994, “Energy Conditions of Metal Resistance to Tribological Wear,” Ph.D. thesis, Świętokrzyska Technical University, Kielce; Żurowski, 1996, “Energy Aspect of Increasing Wear-Resistance of Metals in the Process of Engineering Dry Friction,” Ph.D. thesis, Świętokrzyska Technical University, Kielce; Sadowski and Żurowski, 1992, “Thermodynamic Aspects of Metals' Wear-Resistance,” Tribology and Lubrication Engineering, 3, pp. 152–159] are employed to describe, in quantitative terms, selected tribological systems on the basis of the presented thermodynamic model. A method of determining the complex systemic constants C and D is developed. Specific work of wear, wear severity, probability of emergence of a flux of tribological wear products, and relation of worn mass to heated mass and flash temperature as functions of temperature are defined. This paper concludes with application, significance, and advantages of the complex systemic constants C and D, and phenomena arising in frictional contact between two metals.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of the tribological system (contact area of rubbing bodies and surface area dFi thickness δx) and some assumptions (21)

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Figure 2

Schematic presentation of temperatures Θo and Θ in the contact area of top layers (21)

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Figure 3

Dependence of wear severity J and specific work of wear eRx on temperature Θ for systems characterized by friction coefficient μ=0, 3(1), μ=0, 4(2), and μ=0 and 5(3) for friction parameters v=1 m/s and 0 m/s and p=0 MPa and 4 MPa (24)

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Figure 4

Dependence of wear severity J and specific work of wear eRx on temperature Θ in the case of friction of nonferrous alloys: (1) copper, (2) aluminum, (3) zinc, (4) lead, and (5) LC60 alloy (based on figures in Table 2) (24)

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Figure 5

Dependence of the probability P and relation δ on temperature Θ for systems characterized with friction coefficient μ=0, 3(1), μ=0, 4(2), and μ=0, 5(3) for friction parameters v=1 m/s and p=0 MPa and 4 MPa (24)

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Figure 6

Dependence of the probability P and relation δ on temperature Θ in the case of ferrous alloy friction: (1) copper, (2) aluminum, (3) zinc, (4) lead, and (5) LC60 alloy (based on figures in Table 2) (24)

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