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Technical Briefs

Study of Wear Self-Repair of Steel 100Cr6 Rubbed With Lubricants Modified With Schiff Base Copper Complex

[+] Author and Article Information
Xinlei Gao1

School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430023, P. R. Chinagaox10131@163.com

Li Wu

 Wuhan Research Institute of Materials Protection, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030, P. R. China; School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430074, P. R. China

Jian Li, Wanzhen Gao

 Wuhan Research Institute of Materials Protection, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430030, P. R. China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Tribol 132(3), 034504 (Jul 21, 2010) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001963 History: Received November 30, 2009; Revised June 03, 2010; Published July 21, 2010; Online July 21, 2010

Preparation of a Cu (II) chelate of bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine was carried out directly in epoxidized rape oil via a water/oil microemulsion reactor. Detailed characterization of the friction of boundary lubrication produced by epoxidized rape oil with and without the Cu (II) chelate of bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine was performed in reciprocating sliding tests with a microtribometer. In the presence of a modification of the epoxidized rape oil with 2 wt % of the Cu (II) chelate of bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine, the friction coefficient decreased by 15%. The Cu (II) chelate of bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine served as the additive in the epoxidized rape oil and self-assembled on the surface of 100Cr6 steel. The self-assembled monolayer was detected with atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and characterized with cyclic voltammetry. It was verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses that steel/steel rubbing pairs underwent a selective transfer of organic substance and copper, as a result of lubrication with the modified lubricant. It indicated that the modification of epoxidized rape oil with Cu (II) chelate of bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediamine led to wear self-repair on the steel surface, with selective transfer of a film of organic substance and copper metal.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

Friction coefficient of different lubricants with steel/steel point contact (veg=epoxidized rape oil, veg scu1=modified epoxidized rape oil with 1% Schiff base copper complex, veg scu2=modified epoxidized rape oil with 2% Schiff base copper complex, and veg scu3=modified epoxidized rape oil with 3% Schiff base copper complex)

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Figure 3

AFM topography of steel plate after 980 min with steel/steel point surface contact with the different lubricants. (a) With vegetable oil. (b) With modified lubricants with 1% Schiff base copper complex. (c) With modified lubricants with 2% Schiff base copper complex. (d) With modified lubricants with 1% Schiff base copper complex.

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Figure 4

Wear depths of steel plate after 980 min with steel/steel point contact with the different lubricants

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Figure 5

Electrochemical response of SAM steel specimens after 980 min rubbing with steel/steel surface contact with the different oils or original steel plate

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Figure 7

XPS of steel plate after 980 min rubbing with steel lubricated with 2% Schiff base copper complex-modified lubricant

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Figure 6

SEM images of steel surfaces with different conditions. (a) Original steel specimen. (b) Steel specimen rubbed with epoxidized rape oil. (c) Steel surface rubbed with lubricant that had been modified with 2% Schiff base copper complex.

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Figure 1

Pseudoternary phase diagram of TX-100, Span 80/n-butanol-epoxidized rape oil-alcohol (S+AS denotes surfactant/cosurfactant mixture, O denotes epoxidized rape oil, and E denotes alcohol)

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